BUILDING FINE ART COLLECTIONS SINCE 1965

2014

 

KARINA HEAN + ERIKA HUDDLESTON
August 15 - September 13
Artists' Reception, August 22, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek presents an exhibition of two artists-Karina Hean + Erika Huddleston- who address the changing landscape. Hean's interest lies in nature's whole; Huddleston's in the urban environment. Featured in the late summer exhibition are Wonder/Wander, Hean's latest series of invented landscapes, and Huddleston's new series of large scale paintings, Views of Shoal Creek.

KARINA HEAN's artwork, grounded in drawing, explores responses to the landscape and encourages conversation about how we conserve, preserve, reshape and utilize our environment. Featured in the exhibition is her newest series, Wonder/Wander. The works on paper, she says, "draw on what is seen and thought while wandering, often by walking, in open space. I imagine the floating landforms in several of the prints to move through the atmosphere untethered, as if I could take a beautiful contour of land, dislodge it and set it free."

Hean's process in creating her monoprints is multifaceted, incorporating monotype printmaking, linocut and collage techniques. Each print is hand pulled with several passes through the press. Working light to dark, translucent to opaque, she creates the layered imagery. "There are," she notes, "some recurring subjects generated from the same template or matrix, making each print another version, location, or moment within the invented landscapes."

Karina Noel Hean is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and teaches at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design. She has served on the faculty at the University of Montana, Fort Lewis College and New Mexico State University and holds a BA from St. Johns College, a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate from Studio Art Centers International and an MFA from New Mexico State University. Karina has worked with SITE Santa Fe on exhibitions and educational programs and for the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts as the Visual Arts Coordinator. She received an American Artist Fellowship at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation, Ireland, has completed several artist-in-residence opportunities in the US, and is included in the Drawing Center's Viewing Program.

ERIKA HUDDLESTON focuses on the study of nature in urban settings. In particular, she is interested in better understanding how perceiving changing natural processes in an urban park setting can affect human psychology. "There's a psychological benefit to seeing the result of this dynamic process," Erika stated. "You know there was this flooding, and rushing water, but after a while, the creek calms and becomes peaceful again. It's reassuring knowing that no matter how chaotic nature gets, it always becomes peaceful again."

As artist-in-residence with Shoal Creek Conservancy, she has created a series of large scale paintings, a continuation of her study of the central Austin creek that empties into Lady Bird Lake. "I am currently working downstream from Duncan Park (9th Street) and along the trails where I paint life size on location," she says. "Sometimes the creek is truly a shoal of dry limestone pebbles, sometimes there is a thin skim of water, and at other times there is 5' of water from a flood." Huddleston's earlier study of Shoal Creek focused on the site near 24th Street and Lamar.

Huddleston holds a BA in Fine Arts from Vanderbilt University and a Masters degree in Landscape Architecture from University of Texas-Austin. Her interest in Shoal Creek and its natural aspects began in graduate school. "As Austinites, we have this great wilderness in such close proximity. I realized that I could merge my art background with my landscape analysis. Painting provides a complimentary data-collection counterpart to digital mappings of landscapes and is a tactic for recording temporal change which is traditionally considered difficult to depict in plan."

high-resolution images:
Erika Huddleston, working at creekside, July 2014
Huddleston / Cycle I, Shoal Creek at Duncan Park
Huddleston / Cycle III, Shoal Creek at Duncan Park
Hean / Wonder/Wander VIII

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Erika Huddleston, Shoal Creek Conservancy art-in-residence
painting creekside, July 2014
Photo by George Gonzalez

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Huddleston / Cycle I, Shoal Creek at Duncan Park
oil on canvas / 69.5 x 60 in.

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Huddleston / Cycle III, Shoal Creek at Duncan Park
oil on canvas / 69.5 x 60 in.

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Hean / Wonder/Wander VIII
monoprint collage / 21" x 15"

 

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TONY SALADINO and KAREN HAWKINS
May 16 - June 14
Opening reception, Friday, May 16, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to showcase Tony Saladino and Karen Hawkins in an exhibition that opens on May 16 and runs through June 14. The gallery, located at the Flatbed Building, will host an opening reception on Friday, May 16, from 6 to 8 pm.

Diverse in medium and direction, the current work by Mr. Saladino and Ms. Hawkins stands in contrast yet creates an integrated presentation of the intersection of form and movement. The exhibition will feature large scale abstracted paintings and monotypes by Saladino alongside sculptural installations created from decommissioned books by Karen Hawkins.

Working on flat surfaces, Tony Saladino moves with ease between painting and printmaking. Movement and fluidity are the foundation for both as he strives for spontaneity in his mark making. "Inspiration," he says, "comes from encountering the verticals and horizontals of a sometimes vast, other times immediate view. Although I call my current work abstract there are, to me, obvious markers or signs of what is real on the roadside or my studio yard."

A sculptor, Karen Hawkins' work explores "the book," a rapidly declining composition, and how, or whether, it remains purposeful in a digital age. "I begin changing the book's structure," she notes, "by expanding the physical properties of the book; folding, cutting and excavating it, rendering each page largely unreadable, and each book shape-shifted into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art."




TONY SALADINO, who lives and works in Hurst, Texas, begin his association with Gallery Shoal Creek in the 1980's. First showing his mezzotint prints, he moved his focus to painting. In paintings, one saw the same landscape and still life compositions present in the mezzotints, yet in a large scale format. Soon, those landscapes took a turn as the artist moved toward abstracted imagery; landscape elements that were depicted with the mere suggestion of form and geometric references. "The evolution has been fascinating to watch," says the gallery's owner Judith Taylor. "Over the course of twenty years, the need for structure has given way to spontaneity."

"I leave out a lot of visual information while retaining what is essential to convey my reaction to a subject or scene, knowing that the viewer will fill in the spaces and hopefully will engage with the work on a personal level. In the Earth Forms Series of both monotypes and the large works on canvas, I seek to contrast the flat vastness of the landscape and the detail of what is near. The cooler pieces describe visually how water on the land changes with the sun's light and how the wind creates water movement or placid mirror like surfaces."

"I go from working with the inks of printmaking in doing the monotypes to the paints that have a much more fluid response. I enjoy the challenge of moving from one to another medium. As in everything, there are connections. The pigment left on the plate I use to make a monotype often leaves cognate images upon which I start another piece getting many serendipitous passages. Similarly, when painting, I wipe my leftover brush paint on the next blank canvas providing an amorphous background spread undeliberately over the new canvas. As I paint, I move between brush and spatula - consider the areas that need to be more quiet and peaceful using them to juxtapose the detail and highlights of a focal point where I want the viewer's eye to travel."

Austin artist KAREN HAWKINS loves books. She finds materials and inspiration for her sculpted forms from books that have been decommissioned, pulled from shelves and discarded. "In creating small and large-scale sculptures from the pages of [these] old, forgotten books," notes Chris Cowden (executive director, Women and Their Work), "Hawkins deconstructs and re-purposes the meaning originally found there. The authority and significance of the printed page-harkening back to the first mass printed book, the Gutenberg Bible-is becoming obsolete in the digital age. In Hawkins' work, the page assumes a different role, becoming a vehicle for nostalgia conveyed through form. Her process (like reading) illustrates the passage of time but meaning is perceived as visceral rather than cerebral."

As viewers, we marvel at the transformation, the structural elements and the forms that emerge. For Hawkins, though, it is the process that drives her artistic focus. "I begin by changing the book's structure-folding, cutting and excavating it-and rendering each page largely unreadable. Each book shape shifts into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art. As the meaning of each book is subjugated to [this] objectification process, a shifting beauty transpires, aside from any language or text or etching held between the endpapers. . . I like seeing the type turn into something else when I'm folding it, and the letters switch from vertical to horizontal and take on new shape. My work can only be created by absolute perfection in repetition, and that appeals to me. There's something very meditative to me about this motion."

high-resolution images:
Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

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Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
acrylic / 56 x 48 in.

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Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

 

 

 

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ALEKSANDER & LYUBA TITOVETS
April 25 - May 24
Opening reception, Friday, April 25, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek will showcase new work by Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets in an exhibition which celebrates the classically trained duo's artistic success each has achieved in their adopted country. The Titovets will be in Austin for the opening reception on Friday, April 25, from 6 to 8 pm.

In 1992, Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets left their homeland and the city of St. Petersburg to resettle in El Paso, Texas. Summarizing the couple's journey, a former professor of Aleksander's at the St. Petersburg University pointed out, "You got your education in Russia, but you became an artist in the United States." The two signature pieces for the show, Sunny Texas and Secret Garden, capture the life they have built for their family in the arid region of their adopted country.

Inspired by the light and landscape of two worlds, Aleksander's impressionistic work reveals his classical training while creating a warmth and energy reflective of the artist himself. Lyuba's talent lies in her visual narratives. The elements she gathers for a still life tell a story awash in vibrant colors, while her festive village scenes conjure the folklore of her childhood.

Background

Aleksander, the youngest of three boys, grew up in a cabin in the woods of western Siberia. "We did not have much, but we had a big family and were very happy." His work, he acknowledges, is derived from his childhood experiences of "sitting in a cabin in the forest in winter, watching the last light of day, [I felt as if I] could melt into nature."

Today, Aleksander continues to gravitate to the natural world of his youth and the classical training of the Russian School of Oil Painting. Stylistically, he combines the genre's powerful, realistic involvement with the soft, lyrical looseness of impressionism to create what he calls "quiet paintings" – paintings which reveal a reflective and optimistic spirit. His strong, confident brushstrokes and harmonic use of color create inviting warmth that dominates all his work, particularly the signature winterscapes.

Lyuba grew up in St. Petersburg (formerly Leningrad) amidst the city's rich cultural heritage. The only child of two engineers, she describes her parents as "Russian intellectuals ... known for their love of culture. I was surrounded by it. At five, I began my first art classes; at 10 years of age, I began art school. My dreams were different from my friends... for me, painting was almost like breathing."

The Titovets met while students at the State University in St. Petersburg where both received a BA and MFA from the College of Fine Arts. Exploring a range of creative expressions, Lyuba worked in stage and costume design, illustrated books, and was involved with the development of an art history program which integrated history, philosophy and the arts.

In paintings and drawings, Lyuba relies on her love of visual storytelling and her observations centered on universal themes – people, customs, and social exchange. A sense of interaction comes to play in each painting as she gathers elements to create narratives awash in vibrant color. From festive village scenes to still life compositions and interior vignettes, the focus is on simple things and the pleasures people find in everyday life. So, it is no surprise that the cultural heritage of the Southwest appeals to her.

"I believe that we live in a perfect environment... whereas on the two coasts, east and west, everything is derivative of the European. Here, the blend of Indian, Mexican, Spanish and European is a mix that has created a style that continues to evolve and capture the imagination." With discipline and drive that never wavers, the Titovets have added their own heritage to the cultural mix of their adopted city and country.

Since arriving in the United States, Lyuba has received numerous awards and honors from national and international competitions including the National Oil Painters of America competition, Great American Artists exhibition in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Westminster Abbey show in London. Her name is included in the Archive of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. Additionally, Lyuba's work is in public and private collections in the United States and seven other countries, and she has illustrated several books.

Aleksander has participated in competitions with the National Academy of Design in New York and the Oil Painters of America. He won Best of Show in the International Fine Art Competition four years in a row among competitors in his region. For many years running, he has been selected as a guest artist for Great American Artists and Artists of America who honored him in 1998 with the Artist's Choice Award. His work is included in public and private collections worldwide, including those of Sophia Loren and the King of Spain, His Majesty Juan Carlos.

In 2008, Aleksander was invited to the White House to meet First Lady Laura Bush, whose official portrait he would paint for the National Portrait Gallery. It was an extraordinary honor for the Russian who came to this country with twenty-five dollars in his pocket and in a few short years achieved national recognition and success as an artist.

high-resolution images:
Lyuba Titovets / Secret Garden
Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
Lyuba Titovets / Winter Festival
Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas
Aleksander Titovets / Bright Winter Evening
Aleksander Titovets / Winter Alley

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Lyuba Titovets / Secret Garden
oil on canvas / 30 x 30 in.

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Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

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Lyuba Titovets / Winter Festival
acrylic on canvas / 48 x 24 in.

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Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

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Aleksander Titovets / Bright Winter Evening
oil on canvas / 40 x 30 in.

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Aleksander Titovets / Winter Alley
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI: New Works
March 21 - April 12
Opening reception, Friday, March 21 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek continues its longtime relationship with New York based painter Milt Kobayashi with a solo exhibition, March 21 through April 12. The 2014 exhibition marks the 30th anniversary of the gallery's representation of Kobayashi.

Time stands still in Milt Kobayashi's urban paintings. Yet, the expressive narrative flows and ebbs with a rhythmic cadence of color and brevity of brushstrokes. Masterfully, he distills the essence of an intimate moment or a late-night mood to the point that the imagery itself engages the audience in an intriguing dialogue. It is with the mere hint of detail that Kobayashi has perfected his fine art of subtlety.

A third generation Japanese-American, Kobayashi blends the elements of oriental line, pattern and composition with a refreshing spontaneity. As a young illustrator in New York City, he frequented the Metropolitan Museum of Art to study the masters - Sargent, Chase, Duveneck, Vuillard, Velazquez. Even today, as a highly successful painter, he returns often to spend time with the artists of the 18th and 19th century who have influenced his own work.

Like Whistler before him, Kobayashi studied "ukiyo-e" prints by Japanese masters such as Hokusai, Sharaku, and Utamaro. He was drawn to their use of color harmonies, patterns, negative spaces, and especially their approach to composition and design. Here he found balance, a way to blend a strong design aesthetic with an intimate characterization of his subject.

Milt Kobayashi shipped his first paintings to Austin in 1984, at the invitation of the former owner Ann Hagood. It was the first time the artist had exhibited outside of New York City. The four works were well received, and soon he had a strong base of collectors in Texas for his intriguing urban paintings. The gallery hosted its first solo exhibition with Kobayashi in the fall of 1989. Interestingly, that exhibition was the first gallery showing in which current owner Judith Taylor was involved. Gallery Shoal Creek has hosted numerous solo exhibitions for the artist and placed his work with collectors throughout the US, Canada, and Europe. Taylor credits Kobayashi as having had a significant impact on the evolution of the gallery over the last three decades by prompting a move toward a contemporary collection of artists.

high-resolution images:
Comfortable Place
Baby Blanket
Curled Up

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Comfortable Place
oil / 20 x 20 in.

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Baby Blanket
oil / 12 x 8 in.

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Curled Up
oil / 12 x 12 in.

 

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INTERNATIONAL PRINTMAKERS
Brian Curling / Ina Kaur / Karen Kunc
Monika Meler / Michael Schneider
Annu Vertanen / Koichi Yamamoto
Presented in conjunction with
PrintAustin 2014
January 24 - February 22

Ms. Kunc and the six other participating printmakers - Ina Kaur, Koichi Yamamoto, Monika Meler, Michael Schneider, Annu Vertanen, and Brian Curling - are among the most noted contemporary printmakers working today. The gallery will host an Opening Reception on Friday, January 24, 6 to 8 pm; Ms. Kunc, Ms. Kaur, and Mr. Yamamoto will be in the gallery on Saturday, January 25, for a special Artists' Talk set for 11 am.

The exhibition, International Printmakers, brings together seven artists from diverse backgrounds and experiences. All embrace exploration and experimentation and in unison provide a global overview of contemporary printmaking. The works "speak to each other and create a multifaceted way to view ideas," notes Ms. Kunc. "As viewers, we seek connections and contrasts."

Common threads run throughout the selected work, yet each artist brings his or her distinct voice to the conversation. Viewed in this new context, an expansive dialogue emerges, one which Ina Kaur describes as a "synthesis between opposites -- East/West, ancient/modern, oriental/occidental -- and how they coexist. "

BRIAN CURLING
American born, Curling received his MFA at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, where he was influenced by Karen Kunc. Following graduate school he was awarded a residency by the Finnish Graphics Council and traveled to Helsinki. Returning to America, he taught for briefly at the Cleveland Institute of Art before accepting a position as assistant professor of art at The American University in Cairo, where he taught until 2010. He lives in Radebuel, Germany, where he is actively engaged in making woodcut prints, creating large scale public installations, and publishing collaborative letterpress books under Goldfinch Press.

INA KAUR
Kaur was raised in New Delhi, India; she earned her BFA in Drawing and Printmaking at Punjab University, Chandigarh, INDIA, in 2003. Awarded scholarships to Purdue University, she left India at age 23 to pursue graduate studies in Studio Art and there devoted her attention to printmaking. The lure of printmaking for Kaur is that it "is inclusive of all the other mediums," and it leads her to a range of projects from installations to mixed media work. She began her teaching career at Bowling Green University in Ohio, and in 2010 was recruited by University of Tampa. Here, she continued to "explore a continuum of cross-cultural negotiation" by accepting the challenge of rebuilding the art program there.

MONIKA MELER
Originally from Brodnica, Poland, Meler immigrated with her parents at age 10. She earned a B.F.A. from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design and continued studies at Purdue University, where she earned an M.A., followed by an M.F.A from the Tyler School of Art, Temple University. While at Tyler, she spent a year studying in Rome, Italy. She has held residencies at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Connecticut, the Frans Masereel Center in Belgium, the Cork Printmakers in Ireland and the Women's Studio Workshop in New York. Currently, Meler is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Visual Arts, College of the Pacific, in Stockton, California.

ANNU VERTANEN
Annu Vertanen was born in Imatra, Finland, and studied art at the Kankaanpää Art School, Lahti Art School, and University of Art and Design in Helsinki. Finnish printmakers are known worldwide for their experimentation and innovation in the techniques of printmaking. Such is the case for Vertanen who spent time in Japan mastering mokuhanga (the ancient method of printing with water-based inks). She originally studied painting, but in a workshop with Karen Kunc found the means by which "it was possible to place a painter's personality into a woodcut so perfectly that brushes and canvases could be abandoned." Today, Vertanen and Kunc are among the most important artists in the world working with woodcuts.

KOICHI YAMAMOTO
Born in Japan, Yamamoto is an artist who merges the traditional and contemporary in the language of printmaking. He completed a BFA in 1992 at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon, and then moved to Krakow, Poland, to continue his artistic production. He studied copper engraving at Bratislava Academy of Fine Arts in Slovakia and continued at the Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan, Poland. In 1999, he completed his MFA at University of Alberta, Canada, and then moved to Denmark where he worked as a textile designer before beginning his teaching career. Today, he is an Associate Professor at University of Tennessee, Knoxville - considered one of the top printmaking programs in the country.

MICHAEL SCHNEIDER
Born in Austria, Schneider studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and at the Tokyo University of the Arts in Japan. Since 1990, he has worked intensively in the medium of woodblock printing and has been involved in non-traditional approaches to printmaking including installation, performance, and sound. Schneider is founder and co-editor of "Im:Print" - journal of the Current State of Printmaking and staff-writer of "Um:Druck"- journal for Printmaking and Visual Culture. He currently teaches as a faculty member at the Department of Graphics and Printmaking, Institute of Fine Arts and Media Art of the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria, and is Adjunct Faculty in the Art Department at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri.

KAREN KUNC
Recognized as one of the most accomplished printmakers working today, Karen Kunc lives and works in Nebraska where she is Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She received her MFA from Ohio State University in 1977 and her BFA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1975. Kunc was recognized as the 2007 Printmaker Emeritus by the Southern Graphics Council Conference, and has been awarded two Mid-America Arts Alliance / National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Nebraska Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship Master Award, and an Individual Artist Fellowship, Ohio Arts Council. She has taught numerous workshops around the world and served as a visiting artist to over 100 institutions. She has curated exhibitions of American art for Finland, France, and Egypt and frequently serves as a juror for national competitions.

Preview the exhibition

high-resolution images:
Brian Curling / Liminal State
Ina Kaur / Abreast Off
Monika Meler / Pusto/Sucho
Michael Schneider / r.u.t. iro # 1
Annu Vertanen / Network Traces
Koichi Yamamoto / Fukuro Engraving
Karen Kunc / Biocosmic Wave

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Brian Curling / Liminal State
30 x 52 in. paper size / edition of 9

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Ina Kaur / Abreast Off
multi layer color etching, stencil / 24 x 18 in.

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Monika Meler / Pusto/Sucho
diffused relief print, monotype / 37 x 60 in.

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Annu Vertanen / Network Traces
woodcut, mokuhanga / image and paper size 41 x 30 cm, edition 2/10

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Koichi Yamamoto / Fukuro Engraving
origami folded print 10 x 12 in.

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Michael Schneider / r.u.t. iro # 1
mokuhanga woodblock print / 15.8 x 9.8 in., edition 2/3

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Karen Kunc / Biocosmic Wave
woodcut / 21 x 28 in.

 

2013

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EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR
Shawn Camp • Catherine Dudley
Katie Maratta • Sandra C. Fernandez

November 16 - 24
Opening Reception, November 16, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to participate in the 12th annual East Austin Studio Tour. Four gallery artists – each actively involved in the Austin art community – will showcase their work in the gallery's new space in the Flatbed Building on E. MLK, Jr. Blvd. On Saturday, November 16, from 6-8 p.m., Gallery Shoal Creek will join Flatbed Galleries and other venues in the 18,000 sq. ft. warehouse building in hosting an opening reception on the first evening of EAST.

Shawn Camp / Paintings
Camp's paintings explore the human need to seek out order from disorder. In doing so, he pares down the idea of landscape to a textured surface of paint that conveys topographic features along with references to boundaries, roads and navigational marks. The thickly applied paint and pasted text reveal an intersection of the raw, natural environment and the ordered grid we project upon it. The text, which is almost entirely hidden from view, reminds one of languages from lost civilizations obscured by vast distances of time.

Catherine Dudley / Printmaking
Dudley will showcase two recent series published at Flatbed. The first series, Reveille, incorporates an etched image – a bull's eye target – and is a representation of art and life coming together. In creating these monoprints, she screenprints patterns of color on the vintage surfaces, which are then adhered to the etched and inked plate and run through the press adding the chine collé element. Her latest release, an editioned suite, was created from solar plates etched from retro style graphic drawing. The suite titled Network l, ll, III, and Blue Network was completed in editions of twelve just in time for the upcoming EAST 2013.

Katie Maratta / Horizonscapes
In creating her "horizonscapes," Katie Maratta acknowledges an apparent contradiction. While the literal picture plane is incredibly small - one inch high and up to four feet long, the visual space it suggests is vast. The technique is understated and monochromatic, but the elements of the composition retain their weight and authority. Upon moving to Texas in the mid 1990's, Maratta was struck by the rich visual experience of West Texas. While these wide-open expanses and long lonely highways may be the stuff of clichéd country songs and western movies, they still evoke wonder for the Princeton educated artist who calls Austin home.

Sandra C. Fernandez / Mixed Media Printmaking
Reflecting on her own personal history, Fernandez explores the human experience as it surfaces across time and cultural geographies. Her most recent series, "Borders," are abstractions that relate to the Mexican/USA border and immigration. As is typical of Fernandez's approach, she merges varied media into each piece. She creates both intaglio prints and serigraphs; to these she adds textural elements - chine collé, blind embossing and thread drawing. Stitching directly onto the work provides a cultural link to the crafts traditionally created by women in Ecuador, the home of Fernandez's formative years.

high-resolution images:
Shawn Camp / The Law of Accelerating Returns
Catherine Dudley / Reveille #5
Katie Maratta / Corrugated Shed
Sandra C. Fernandez / CAUTION: Dreamers in/on sight

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Shawn Camp / The Law of Accelerating Returns
oil and mixed media / 16 x 16 in.

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Catherine Dudley / Reveille #5
monoprint on paper, 18 x 14 paper size (8 x 6 image)

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Katie Maratta / Corrugated Shed
mixed media drawing / 2 x 3 in. mounted on 5 x 7 inch metal panel

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Sandra C. Fernandez / CAUTION: Dreamers in/on sight
serigraphy, chine collé and thread drawing / 22 x 30 in.

 

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LANDSCAPE PERSPECTIVES
Jerry Ruthven + Kirk Tatom

October 18 - November 9
Artists' Reception, October 18, 6-8 pm

Landscape Perspectives brings together two highly respected painters, Jerry Ruthven and Kirk Tatom, to explore regional viewpoints. Ruthven, a native Texan, is known for his realistic, atmospheric imagery of the rolling hills of Central Texas. A tonalist, Tatom gravitates to the rural areas of the Midwest and the West for his subject matter.

The exhibition opens at Gallery Shoal Creek, October 18, and runs through November 9. The gallery will host an opening reception on October 18, 6-8 pm.

JERRY RUTHVEN

Jerry Ruthven's roots are in Central Texas. Here, he has spent a lifetime walking dry creek beds and following abandoned fence lines. Like the early American landscape painters whose work he admires, he takes great pride in the region's natural beauty. Leaning toward realism, his painterly work captures on canvas the peaceful solitude and seasonal hues of the Texas Hill country.

Ruthven approaches a painting from sky to foreground, a technique he learned from studying Robert Woods. Figuratively speaking, he wants the viewer to walk though the painting, drawn by a focal interest as simple as stones in a creek bed or a winding dirt road. The composition leads one's eye to the horizon; details add the accuracy. On location, he spends hours sketching to refresh his visual memory - how does the light hit the rock ledge? From what perspective can the steepness of the cliff be portrayed? Endless drawings provide the answers.

Ruthven's landscapes are more than just an accurate depiction of the regional terrain's ruggedness and beauty. The ever changing weather plays its part, too. Anyone – farmer, rancher, outdoorsman, gardener – who relishes the land learns quickly to read the weather, to recognize its mood. It is Ruthven's ability to translate these elements that distinguish his landscapes. His visual imagery engages the senses. One feels the sultry heat from the haze on the horizon or smells the impending rain form dark clouds rolling in from the west.

Ruthven continues the legacy of Texas landscape painting – a tradition established by Julian Onderdonk. Ruthven, like Onderdonk, not only paints the vast Texas landscapes, he interprets its many moods.

KIRK TATOM

Stylistically a tonalist, Kirk Tatom paints what is on his mind rather than what is in his backyard. Choosing the lush green fields and farms of Utah, Missouri and Colorado for his subject, he captures a pace of life that reflects his love of that countryside and "the simple purposefulness of that land." "[It is the] richness in land that you cannot stop from growing green that seduces me. There is an atmosphere in its solitude that distills an image, a pastoral leaning that permeates the way I see upper Michigan every August or view Oklahoma on the way to Missouri or even the way I view my day to day Santa Fe."

Kirk Tatom was one of the foremost carvers of stone in Santa Fe for nearly 20 years. In 1997 he put down the chisel and picked up the paint brush. Yet, a sculptural spirit carries through in his paintings. The carved outline of a stream or the rugged cracks of a cliff create an abstract viewpoint derived from the eye of one adept at working in three dimensions.

Painting on wood panels, Tatom spends long hours preparing his surfaces and laying in the glowing, translucent backgrounds that give his work an old world quality. When he adds meticulous details, he somehow makes them appear spontaneous. Even his most intimately scaled work takes on the importance of museum pieces because they are intense yet understated.

high-resolution images:
Jerry Ruthven / Falls on Cow Creek
Kirk Tatom / Bosque

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Jerry Ruthven / Falls on Cow Creek
oil / 24 x 36 in.

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Kirk Tatom / Bosque
oil on panel / 20 x 30 in.

 

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METAPHORICALLY SPEAKING
René Alvarado + Marianne McGrath
September 20 - October 12
Artists' Reception, September 20, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek presents three-dimensional sculpture by Marianne McGrath set against the vivid backdrop of large-scale paintings by René Alvarado. Speaking in metaphors,both artists create works which present emotional responses to their roots and their personal connection to the landscapes of their childhoods. The exhibition opens Sept. 20 at the gallery's new location in the Flatbed Building and runs through Oct. 12.

Marianne McGrath
Through her sculpture and installation work, McGrath juxtaposes porcelain and industrial materials in unconventional ways as she initiates a conversation between the natural and the artificial. Bridge, her newest piece, features stark, ceramic reeds sprouting from concrete blocks. Roots, a series rendered in varying sizes, consists of tree roots growing out of a line of porcelain row houses, suspended in air like an impossible dream while physicalizing a human ideal. Each piece is a study in contradiction, crafted to suggest that the permanent is almost impossible in the natural world but a constant objective of memory and thought. These works present scenarios that are impossible yet immediately visually understood, that speak of both landscapes lost and the longing for this idea of home that we as humans all possess.

"I draw inspiration from a childhood spent on a Southern California farm and my experience of revisiting it for the first time while in graduate school. I found that the farm, which had been in my family for five generations, was now tract housing, freeway ramps and a shopping center. I began to question how these memories of mine could have validity when there is no longer a physical landscape in which to place them. These works present an inherent contrast of meaning; landscapes that exist as memory, not as the physical environments that one may remember them to be."

(Adapted from an interview with McGrath by Diego Vega, 2013)

René Alvarado
Alvarado draws on the natural world to create narratives of family and identity. That identity, expressed in a well-honed visual language, blends a complex mixture of personal and adopted iconography. The backdrop of Corona de Cristo, a defining self portrait, represents the landscape of his childhood – a once lush area in Northern Mexico that is now desert due to drought and loss of water rights. As the central figure in Corona de Cristo, the artist wears an eye-piece, symbolizing self-reflection. Surrounding him, female figures reference the artist's sisterly and matriarchal influences. The hands and roses throughout the painting signify familial support and the intermingling of nature and family. The painting is named after the garden plant known in Spanish as Corona de Cristo, which has spear-like thorns on its branches, and is a nod to both nature and the artist's Catholic upbringing.

Focusing on his mastery of layered imagery, Alvarado creates in Garden Dreamscape an engaging metaphorical narrative that addresses the cycles of nature and life. Symbolically, the central, winged female represents the nurturing instinct, breathing life into the reclining figure while assuming guardianship of the garden. Compositionally, the flora forms an altar around the revered, winged mythical figure. Yet, interspersed, there is the playfulness common to Alvarado's work as he draws on favorite symbols to speak of human traits. The dog sitting next to the female represents loyalty; the horse - always in a prancing stance - suggests a childlike curiosity as he sniffs the bright red fruit. The window, a passageway through life, gives homage to what has formed one's identity while leaving an opening for what is ahead.

high-resolution images:
René Alvarado / Corona de Cristo
René Alvarado / Garden Dreamscape
Marianne McGrath / Bridge
Marianne McGrath / Roots

art
René Alvarado / Corona de Cristo
oil on canvas / 40 x 30 in.

art
René Alvarado / Garden Dreamscape
oil on canvas / 84 x 96 in.

art
Marianne McGrath / Bridge (detail)
porcelain, reclaimed wood, cement / 5' x 10' x 3'

art
Marianne McGrath / Roots
earthenware, tree roots / 6' x 5' x 6"

 

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Compound Interests
August 23 through September 14, 2013
Artists Reception
Friday, August 23, 6 o'clock to 8

Gallery Shoal Creek, in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History in the College of Fine Arts at The University of Texas at Austin, announces Compound Interests, a group exhibition celebrating the artwork of eight members of the university faculty who will be retiring in 2013: Thelma Coles, Tom Druecker, Mark Goodman, Ken Hale, Don Herron, Lawrence McFarland, Bradley Petersen, and Susan Whyne. This is an eclectic group that has influenced students and contributed much to the university's studio art program over the course of forty years.

The title Compound Interests refers not only to the concept of value accrued over time (as in "compound interest," singular), but also to the kind of growth that this group of artists, their students, and co-faculty have experienced in sustaining a long-term dialog and proximity with one another's diverse artistic interests.

Individually, the eight artists are painters, photographers, printmakers, metal and ceramic artists - each held in high esteem for their own creative work. The exhibition will draw on the artists' most recent work along with earlier works which originated during their time at the University of Texas at Austin.

A full color catalogue with text by Jeannie McKetta and an introduction by Jack Risley, Department Chair and the Ruth Head Centennial Professor of the Department of Art and Art History will be available.

Preview the exhibition
View Catalogue

high-resolution images:
Ken Hale / Frameworks: Complex Cage
Ken Hale / Frameworks: Half Dome Cage
Lawrence McFarland / Top of Mokie Dugway, Rain
Lawrence McFarland / Fort Robinson Sunset

artart
Ken Hale / Framework Series
collage and gouache

art
Lawrence McFarland / Top of Mokie Dugway, Rain

 

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PRINTS & DRAWINGS
Catherine Dudley . Karina Hean . Karen Kunc

June 10 through July 2, 2013
Reception
Friday, June 21, 6 o'clock to 8

Three artists find common ground in a desire to create order in the world around them. Their creative processes embrace exploration and speak metaphorically through their visual imagery. As viewers engage with the work, we ask both why and how - an affirmation to the artists' ability to draw us in, to generate dialogue.

From repetitive patterns to campy graphics in a retro series
CATHERINE DUDLEY's fondness for found papers, printmaking and the layering of elements comes together in her campy, design conscious imagery that balances subtle inferences and a light-hearted playfulness. Dudley uses her extensive collection of found papers, both as backgrounds and elements for collage. Mixing inks to complement these aged vintage surfaces, she screenprints graphic patterns of color; from the patterned papers, she cuts geometric shapes - flags, darts, and linear forms - that we see throughout her work. Reveille, her latest series of monotypes, incorporates varied print processes. Screenprinted patterns of color on vintage surfaces in hand, she adheres them to the etched and inked plates during the printing process to create the chine collé element. The bull's-eye/target offers a focal point to each piece, and symbolizes the artist's optimistic spirit – her feelings of art and life coming together.

Nature's complexities in movement and metaphors
KARINA NOEL HEAN's drawings emphasize a connection with place – both real and invented – yet grounded in the landscape and its visual pleasures. These imagined landscapes are un-traversable spaces derived from moving through and observing terrain. From her interest in selecting, recombining, and embellishing specimens from nature's complexity, she creates both emotional metaphors and visual imagery that draws on the elements of light, pattern, form, and land formations. On paper, her structures bracketing or supporting organic masses reference order while the contained, roiling, and often chaotic subjects suggest living storms, momentarily stilled. "Nothing is ordinary in [Hean's world], notes John Viahakis. "They are at once a microscopic examination and a cosmic adventure set into motion."

A textural language both ordered and poetic
KAREN KUNC, known internationally for her abstract woodcut prints, incorporates richly hued shapes with a timeless textural language. What distinguishes her prints from other contemporary work, notes curator David Acton, is the lush exuberance and tactile resonance of wood, paper and impression. Kunc has developed her own distinctive manner of reductive printing from plywood blocks, stenciling and masking along the way. The irregularity of the wood and the delicacy of the artist's touch are always apparent. So, too, are her remarkable color sense and her ability to layer dense color with areas of veiled shading. By saturating the tissue-thin mulberry paper with ink and allowing it to bleed to the fiber's feathered edges, she emphasizes the organic nature of the work while balancing order and free flowing forms.

high-resolution images:
Catherine Dudley / Reveille 13
Catherine Dudley / Reveille 5
Karina Hean / Traverse IV
Karina Hean / Field Notes XIII
Karen Kunc / Conditions for Water
Karen Kunc / Upon the Waves

art
Catherine Dudley / Reveille 13
monoprint on paper / 18 x 14 in. paper size (8 x 6 image)

art
Karina Hean / Traverse IV
charcoal, collage, watercolor, conte, graphite, intaglio / 30 x 22 in.

art
Karen Kunc / Conditions for Water
woodcut / 15 x 22 in.

 

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GREGG KREUTZ / JENNIFER BELL / TONY SALADINO
April 19 through May 25, 2013
Opening Reception
Friday, April 19, 6 o'clock to 8

An exhibition of new work by Jennifer Bell, Gregg Kreutz, and Tony Saladino marks the opening of Gallery Shoal Creek's new location in the Flatbed Building, 2832 E. MLK Blvd.

The stylistically diverse painters represent the range and quality of fine art for which Gallery Shoal Creek is known. The exhibition, which opens on April 19, explores realism, impressionism, and abstraction, and how they play off of one another.

GREGG KREUTZ / Mystery

Gregg Kreutz's paintings embrace realism in the traditions of the Dutch Masters. A highly versatile painter, his subject matter includes still lifes, landscapes, figures, interiors and urban architecture. He works from his New York City studio overlooking Union Square, and is immersed in life of the city. Compositionally, he focuses on light and shadow and how atmosphere envelops the whole to create illusions and mystery. Kreutz travels frequently and is seldom without his sketchbook. The exhibition will feature recent paintings inspired by visits to the French countryside.

JENNIFER BELL / Imagination

Jennifer Bell's paintings are dramatic inventions of characters set in the late nineteenth century. Each is a snapshot of a moment where observation and imagination merge in the artist's mind. For the Vancouver based artist, the era and works of the Impressionists - the color, the rendering of candid moments - ignites her passion and inspires her art. Her favorite artists of the period, Toulouse-Lautrec and Degas, depicted people whose lives you could imagine. Creating everyday characters/stories that she brings to life, Bell follows in their footsteps.

TONY SALADINO / Rhythm

A master of color, Tony Saladino creates large-scale abstracted landscapes. "Shape sets the structure. . . [but] the interplay of all of the parameters of color set the tone," says the Texas based artist. A native of New Orleans and an avid tango dancer, it is no surprise that Saladino's current works are strongly influenced by music. Inspired by music from Mozart, Debussy or Stravinsky, his process aims to achieve harmony through nuances of hue, temperature and value while creating interest with rhythmic variation.

high-resolution images:
Gregg Kreutz / Bridge in Burgundy
Jennifer Bell / The Young Farmer
Tony Saladino / Rite of Spring IV

art
Gregg Kreutz / Bridge in Burgundy
oil on linen / 28 x 23 in.

art
Jennifer Bell / The Young Farmer
oil / 16 x 20 in.

art
Tony Saladino / Rite of Spring IV
acrylic / 48 x 48 in.

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI
February 28 through March 22, 2013
Opening Reception
Thursday, February 28, 6 o'clock to 8

New York based Milt Kobayashi presents a collection of small works that continues the artist's focus on the female in her quiet world. Here, he models his subjects with slightly more color, leaning towards a yellow palette. His use of broad bravura strokes has given way to tighter control and smaller movements in the brushwork. While his general compositional elements remain the same, the new work demonstrates a growing interest in Nicholai Fechin and the Russian-born painter's subtle modulation in portraying his figures.

high-resolution images:
Quiet Moment
The Red Cloak
There Sat She

art
Quiet Moment
oil / 12 x 12 in.

art
The Red Cloak
oil / 10 x 8 in.

art
There Sat She
oil / 12 x 12 in.

 

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2012

 

POST LINEAR
November 29–January 12
SHAWN CAMP | BEILI LIU | SANDRA PRATT
Opening Reception
Thursday, Nov 29, 6–8

Working on the fringes of landscape, each artist investigates density through collective mark-making. Whether using a literal buildup of paint or intertwining linear forms, the surface undulates from concentrated density to open, sweeping expanses.

SHAWN CAMP
"Consumed with the duality of nature and humanity ... SHAWN CAMP thinks in polarities," notes arts writer Erin Keever. He creates seductive surfaces that both reveal and conceal as his mark-making alternates thickly layered areas with sections of thinly applied paint. In POST LINEAR, Camp's large abstract canvases serve as a metaphor for the spreading mark of humanity on the environment.

BIELI LIU
Multidisciplinary artist, BEILI LIU moves between time and process based installations and two-dimensional works, drawing on everyday materials to craft what she describes as microcosms of fragility and poignancy. "I watch for the moment of surprise, when the material responds to one or a series of actions and leads to an exciting physical or conceptual outcome."

SANDRA PRATT
Spare, yet fluid, SANDRA PRATT'S paintings are intuitive and spontaneous. Drawn to the infinite possibilities of paint, she uses palette knife and broad strokes to create a fresh vantage point of familiar subjects. "There are many ways to tell a story," muses Pratt, who favors simplicity. Following themes of sparse landscapes, coastlines, or the lone house in the distance, Pratt seeks to create space and a meditative stillness.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Shawn Camp / The First Autumn
Beili Liu / Wind Drawing, Current #1
Sandra Pratt / Pale Reflection

art
Shawn Camp / The First Autumn
oil on canvas / 48 x 54 in.

art
Beili Liu / Wind Drawing, Current #1
Sumi ink on canvas / 84 x 60 in.

art
Sandra Pratt / Pale Reflection
oil on canvas / 16 x 13 in.

 

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Aleksander + Lyuba Titovets
September 28 - October 20
Opening reception
Friday, September 28, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek will showcase new work by Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets in a fall exhibition which opens September 28 and runs through October 20, 2012. The exhibition marks the 20th anniversary of the classically trained duo's arrival in the United States and celebrates the artistic success each has achieved in their adopted country. The Titovets will be in Austin for the opening reception on Friday, September 28, from 6 to 8 pm at the gallery's central Austin space.

In 1992, with political change taking hold, the young couple, along with Lyuba's family, was able to emigrate from St. Petersburg, Russia to El Paso, Texas. Within a few short years, the two had established themselves as professional artists, and were warmly embraced by their adopted community. Arriving near the border at the crossroads of cultures, they were met with openness and opportunity. Now, twenty years later, they are recognized nationally and highly collected.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Lyuba Titovets / Spring In The Studio
Aleksander Titovets / Hushed Treasures

art
Lyuba Titovets / Spring In The Studio
oil / 30 x 24 in.

art
Aleksander Titovets / Hushed Treasures
oil on canvas / 24 x 48 in.

 

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PAPER III / Aug 24 - Sep 22
Melissa Jay Craig • Marc Burckhardt
Sandra C. Fernandez • Karen Kunc • Tony Saladino
Opening Reception
Friday, August 24, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek will launch the Fall 2010 exhibition schedule with PAPER III which opens on August 24, and runs through September 22, 2012. The exhibition explores the creative process of five artists whose work incorporates printmaking, drawing, Installation and sculptural works of hand-made paper. The five represent a range of personal experiences and artistic accomplishments. Yet, all share a devotion to the medium of paper, a strong foundation in printmaking and drawing, and a sense of discovery inherent to the multi-staged creative process each pursues.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Fernandez / Peso Pluma
Fernandez / La Torera
Kunc / Ephemera / Open
Kunc / Ephemera / Center
Kunc / As if, as though
Saladino / Allegretto III

art
Fernandez / Peso Pluma
etching / 25.5 x 19.25 in.

art
Fernandez / La Torera
etching / 13 x 11 in.

artart
Kunc / Ephemera
bookwork: woodcut, polymer relief, letterpress
10 x 6 folded, opens to 10 x 42 in.

art
Kunc / As if, as though
woodcut / 15 x 20 in.

art
Saladino / Allegretto III
monotype / 32 x 22 in. image size, 49 x 37 in. framed

 

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RENE ALVARADO / Madonnas
June 8 - 30
Opening Reception
June 8, 6 o'clock to 8

"Seeing my work is like looking in a mirror," says Texas artist René Alvarado. Without question, there is a personal nature to each of Alvarado's paintings. In the upcoming exhibition, his series of Madonna portraits reference both familial and cultural experiences. The female figure, notes Laura Harrison in a recent article, represents the matriarchal society of his childhood and provides him a vehicle to express his deep respect for the women in his family. Each portrait, presented in formal poses and arrayed in symbolic imagery, conveys virtuous strengths and emotional elements that run throughout the artist's narratives. Alvarado's symbolism is a complex mixture of adopted and personal iconography. He draws on the rich cultural heritage of his native Mexico where the reverence for Catholic saints and the cultural folklore intermingle. His metaphorical imagery remains rooted in his heritage yet embraces the world he has traveled and his adopted home in West Texas.

Press release

high-resolution images:
El Amor de Tia Concha
La Novia que Nunca Fue

art
El Amor de Tia Concha
oil on canvas / 48 x 36 in

art
La Novia que Nunca Fue
oil on panel / 36.75 x 25.75 in.

 

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LEONARD LEHRER / printmaker
April 20 - May 19
Opening Reception
April 20, 6 o'clock to 8

Leonard Lehrer is an American artist whose work transcends time. In both his artistic and personal journeys, gardens have been a constant and speak symbolically of cultural histories. As a young man, Lehrer embraced the ordered realm of the formal gardens in France and England. Afforded the opportunity to travel, he discovered the Moorish gardens of the Alhambra in southern Spain, and revisited his family's roots in Eastern Europe, photographing and sketching gardens and city views. The panoramic View of St. Petersburg is just one of many lithographs which fill Lehrer's extensive portfolio. Recently, he began revisiting these earlier black and white works, selecting editioned lithographs to hand-color. In doing so, he has created unique pieces where the patterned rhythmic shapes of skylines, rooftops, statuary and hedgerows are accentuated.

A multifaceted presentation, this solo exhibition reflects on Lehrer's strength of vision and clarity of composition. The formal European perspective—symmetrically balanced vistas and gardens—will hang alongside a newly created series of small still life images. These, too, marry lithographic impressions with watercolor tinting. To cap the installation, a large digital collage titled View from Strawberry Mansion—named after the immigrant community in Philadelphia where he grew up—will celebrate Lehrer's career and his lifelong passion for creating art.

Press release

high-resolution images:
View from Strawberry Mansion
Cythera

art
View from Strawberry Mansion
pigmented Inkjet Print / 58 x 48 in.

art
Cythera
lithograph, hand-colored / 11.25 x 13.5 in.

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI
March 2 - 31
Opening Reception, Friday March 2, 6-8 pm

New York based figurative painter Milt Kobayashi is known internationally for his intimate, urban interiors in which he distills the essence of a casual moment. Expressive narrative, cadence of color, and brevity of the brushstroke characterize the subtle style the artist has perfected.

Gallery Shoal Creek has represented Mr. Kobayashi since 1984. Over the course of nearly three decades, his work has garnered national and international attention. The gallery is proud to be a part of the Kobayashi legacy and to showcase his newest work.

Press release

high-resolution images:
The Moon

art
The Moon
oil / 17 x 12 in.

 

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2011  

THE LANDSCAPE AND BEYOND
Jerry Ruthven
William Kalwick Jr
Kirk Tatom
Aleksander Tiovets
Lyuba Titovets
December 9 through January 14
Opening Reception, Friday December 9, 6-8 pm

From Jerry Ruthven's realistic impressions of the Texas Hill Country to William Kalwick's plein air paintings of the Colorado Rockies, The Landscape and Beyond brings together five artists with distinct styles. Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets, Russian born and classically trained, provide a European perspective while Kirk Tatom leans toward pastoral views with a quiet solitude.

high-resolution images:
Kirk Tatom / Blackberry Creek

art
Kirk Tatom / Blackberry Creek
oil on board / 20 x 23 in.
 

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Marc Burckhardt + Gustavo Torres
November 11 through December 3
Opening Reception, Friday November 11, 6-8 pm

Cast bronze and paint on canvas meet in an exhibition of work by Gustavo Torres and Marc Burckhardt on view at Gallery Shoal Creek from November 11 through December 3.  The opening reception, on Friday, November 11, will unveil an intimate viewing of sculpture, paintings and drawings by the two artists.  Masters of their craft, both Torres and Burckhardt adopt symbolic imagery to convey complex themes and engage the viewer.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Gustavo Torres / Un Comenzar
Marc Burckhardt / Bridle

art
Gustavo Torres / Un Comenzar
23 in. high

art
Marc Burckhardt / Bridle
acrylic & oil on wood panel / 22 x 30 in.

 

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THE SUM OF ALL PARTS / New works
by Shawn Camp
October 14 through November 5
Opening Reception, Friday October 14, 6-8 pm

Working from his spacious studio in East Austin, Camp explores the human need to create order from disorder. The marked landscape becomes a metaphor for this basic human tendency. He distills the ever changing landscape to a textured surface of paint that suggests topographical features and delineates boundaries and navigational markings. The varied application of paint reveals an intersection of the raw, natural environment and the ordered grid that man projects upon it.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Separation of Powers

art
Separation of Powers
oil and mixed media on canvas / 48 x 54 in.

 

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KATIE MARATTA + SANDRA PRATT
KATHARINA LINK
September 9 - October 5
Opening Reception, Friday September 9, 6-8 pm

Through their work, each artist speaks of movement, that sense of "passing by" as Maratta calls it. Pratt records a single frame, distilling the view to near abstraction recording only the essential elements. Maratta, choosing a panoramic format, focuses on the sparse detail etched on a horizon line that stretches as far as the eye can see. Link's three-dimensional ceramics bring the conversation together. Etching loose graphic imagery and delicate detail on the surface of spherical vessels, she conveys a winding narrative within a changing landscape. From the back roads of West Texas to the Autobahn, the three artists share their unique perspective.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Maratta / Winter Orchard
Pratt / Belgium Harbor
Link / ceramics

art
Maratta / Winter Orchard
mixed media drawing / 1 x 12 in.

art
Pratt / Belgium Harbor
oil / 11 x 14 in.

art
Link / ceramics

 

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RENÉ ALVARADO / New Work 2011
May 27 through June 25
Opening Reception, Friday May 27, 6-8 pm

Speaking in the rich visual language for which he is known, Alvarado blends a complex mixture of personal and adopted iconography. The artist's narrative unfolds in his newest canvases as one explores the layered imagery and cultural metaphors; intermixed are sensory impressions from his travels in Morocco and the magical city of Marrakesh. The desert flora and saturated colors of the region add yet another layer to the artist's lush narratives.

Traveling, I often sense an unspoken language of familiarity . . . art. I find myself uncovering a hidden appreciation for the new surroundings and discover, at the same time, a missing piece of my own identity. Such was the case in Morocco as I disappeared from my own reality and became a shadow amongst the colors on a different cultural stage. Morocco imprinted a complex enigma of woven colors, textures, scents and sounds much like El Manantial, my birthplace in northern Mexico.

Press release

high-resolution images:
Flower Duet
Horse in the Garden

art
Flower Duet
oil on canvas / 48 x 48 inches

art
Horse in the Garden
oil + acrylic canvas /48 x 48 inches

 

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TIDES:
HEATHER CARTER + NICHOLAS DERTIEN
April 8 through 30
Opening Reception / April 8, 6:00-8:00 pm
Conversation with the artists / April 9, 12:00 pm

Heather Carter's and Nicholas Dertien's distinct three-dimensional work intersects in TIDES, an ON SITE installation which calls attention to the ebb and flow of time. Carter's lifeboats - constructed of bent wood and reclaimed materials - and Dertien's glass and ceramic surfaces play with light and shadow as they crisscross the gallery's open spaces. Embracing shared themes, the two Austin area artists speak metaphorically of human thresholds, generational imprints, and what we leave in our wake.

Focusing on environmental stewardship issues, Heather Carter [BFA, Southwestern University] is both sculptor and journalist. She lives and works in Wimberley in an off-grid solar powered house/studio. Commissioned by the City of Austin, she created The Souls of the Trees, a multi-piece bent wood installation which hangs in the Spicewood Springs Library.

Nicholas Dertien - artist, designer, glass blower - received his MFA in 2009 from Rhode Island School of Design. Upon returning to Austin, he set up his studio and workshop in a converted quonset hut at ArtPost in East Austin where he introduced his clear glass torsos and photograms in E.A.S.T. 2010.

high-resolution images:
Heather Carter / Life Boats
Nicholas Dertien / Transparent Body

art
Heather Carter / Life Boats
mixed media

art
Nicholas Dertien / Transparent Body
mixed media

 

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PRESENCE / ABSENCE:
Nicholas Dertien, Marcy Freedman,
Francesca Samsel, Sally Weber
ACES Visualization Lab / The University of Texas
24th and Speedway
Celebrate with the artists / April 7, 5:30-8:00 pm
Open to the public / April 9, 11:00 to 5:00 pm

PRESENCE / ABSENCE, a collaboration between Gallery Shoal Creek and The Texas Advanced Computing Center, explores the work of four artists who use digital media to transform the content and experience of their work. The digital exhibition, a collaboration between Gallery Shoal Creek and The Texas Advanced Computing Center, will be on view at the ACES Visualization Lab on the UT campus, April 7 and 9.

Read about the artists.

high-resolution images:
Francesca Samsel / Traced Connections
Sally Weber / Arpeggio

art
Francesca Samsel / Traced Connections

art
Sally Weber / Arpeggio (video still frame)

 

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JILL LEAR
March 11 through April 2
Opening reception
Friday, March 11
6 o'clock to 8

Jill Lear is known for her large scale mixed media renderings of magnificent trees identified by their coordinates. In these, she expresses the landscape as a particular, defined and measured place - those PLACES identified by longitude and latitude. While completing a 2010 artist residency at Yaddo in Saratoga Springs, New York, Lear broadened her explorations to include the idea of territory, that amorphous, intuitive SPACE arrived at through an accumulation of sensory experiences.

high-resolution image:
Quercus Rubra Triptych CP

art
Quercus Rubra Triptych CP
charcoal, acrylic on paper / 50 x 22.5 in. (each

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI
February 10 through March 5
Opening reception
Friday, February 11
6 o'clock to 8

New York based figurative painter, Milt Kobayashi, is known internationally for his intimate, urban works in which he distills the essence of a casual moment. Expressive narrative, cadence of color, and brevity of the brushstroke characterize the subtle style the artist has perfected. Mr. Kobayashi and Gallery Shoal Creek have had a close association for over twenty-five years.

 

In London, MILT KOBAYASHI captured the attention of Godfrey Barker, Art Correspondent of the London Evening Standard.
Read what Barker had to say.

Press release.

high-resolution images:
Loose Lips

art
Loose Lips
oil / 12 x 10 in.

 

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2010  

NEW WORK
ALEKSANDER AND LYUBA TITOVETS
October 22 through November 20
Opening reception
Friday, October 22
6 o'clock to 8

Gallery Shoal Creek will showcase new work by Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets in a fall exhibition which opens on October 22 and runs through November 20, 2010. The classically trained duo immigrated from St. Petersburg, Russia, and both have achieved much artistic success and numerous accolades since arriving in their adopted country in 1992. The Titovets will be in Austin for the opening reception on Friday, October 22, from 6 to 8 pm at the gallery's central Austin space.

Read about the artists and their work.

high-resolution images:
Aleksander Titovets: March
Lyuba Titovets: After the Rain

art
Aleksander Titovets / March

art
Lyuba Titovets / After the Rain

 

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PAPER 2
Melissa Jay Craig . Catherine Dudley
Karen Kunc . Leonard Lehrer . Francesca Samse
l
September 2 through October 9
Artists' Reception:
Friday, September 17
6 o'clock to 8

Gallery Shoal Creek will launch the Fall 2010 exhibition schedule with PAPER 2 which opens on September 2, and runs through October 2, 2010. The Exhibition explores the creative process of five artists whose work incorporates printmaking, collages, and sculptural works of hand-made paper. The gallery will host an artists reception on Friday, September 17.

The artists represent a continuum of personal and artistic experiences. Yet, all share a devotion to the medium of paper, a strong foundation in printmaking, and a sense of discovery inherent to the multi-staged creative process each pursues.

Read about the artists and their work.

Melissa Jay Craig
Catherine Dudley
Karen Kunc
Leonard Lehrer
Francesca Samse

high-resolution images:
Melissa Jay Craig: (S)Edition, detail
Catherine Dudley: Figment, detail
Karen Kunc: Song of the Lark
Leonard Lehrer: Garden IV
Francesca Samsel: Chocolate

art
Melissa Jay Craig / (S)Edition (detail)

art
Catherine Dudley / Figment #26(detail)

art
Karen Kunc / Song of the Lark

art
Leonard Lehrer / Garden IV

art
Francesca Samsel / Chocolate

 

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