BUILDING FINE ART COLLECTIONS SINCE 1965

2017

 

The Aesthetics of
MILT KOBAYASHI
March 17- April 15, 2017
Opening Reception, March 17, 6-8pm

Time stands still in Mr. Kobayashi's quiet moments, yet the expressive narrative ebbs and flows with a cadence of color and distinctive brushwork. Over the course of his career, he has perfected his fine art of subtlety and adopted a growing freedom in his use of color. To describe his artistic aesthetic, Mr. Kobayashi references the Russian-born painter, Nicholai Fechin: "the important thing is not the object painted, but how the canvas is filled through the filter of the artist's creative idea."

Gallery Shoal Creek has represented Milt Kobayashi since 1984, hosting his first solo exhibition outside of New York City in 1989. Over the years, he has garnered national and international attention. The gallery is proud to be a part of the legacy that Mr. Kobayashi has established, placing his work in private collections across the US, Canada, and the UK.

After graduating from UCLA, Kobayashi settled in New York in 1977 to begin a career in illustration; soon he realized that his narrative style would not meet the constraints of commercial art.  At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a painting by Velazquez – the portrait of his long-time assistant Juan de Pareja (1650) – pushed him toward fine art. From here he studied and was influenced by other masters such as Sargent, Chase, and Duvanek.  Even today, as a highly successful painter, he returns often to spend time with the artists of the 18th and 19th century who have inspired his work.

Kobayashi, as did the impressionists before him, seeks to capture fleeting moments of everyday life. Spontaneity, suggested by cropped imagery and gestural expression, is central. His conservation of brushstroke gives an illusion of simplicity, highlighting only that which is essential. One stroke less and the subject is void of structure, one stroke more and the painting is chaotic.

Urban interiors provide his subjects. "For inspiration, I will memorize scenes, store them in my memory and then distill them down to the most important elements. It may be a shadow, a scene from a movie, or the way light hits the face of a stranger walking down the street." In talking with students, he stresses Degas' belief that "relying on memory as opposed to copying a scene or event stimulates the creative process. In this manner, you only reproduce what has stuck with you, that is to say, the essential ... your memories and fantasies are freed from the tyranny which nature holds on them."

A third-generation Japanese-American, Milt Kobayashi masterfully blends the aesthetics of the east and the west. His work is reflective of the significant influence that the arts of Japan had on those working in Paris in the late 19th century.  Artists such as Whistler, Bonnard, Vuillard and Toulouse-Lautrec embraced Japonism during this period.

Kobayashi, too, was drawn to the traditions of Ukiyo-e wood block prints. Ukiyo-e, or "floating world", refers to the young culture that bloomed in cities like Edo, now Tokyo, in the 1700s. The prints depicted this urban lifestyle, scenes from the entertainment districts, beautiful courtesans and popular actors. 

Kobayashi's distinct style also adopts the compositional freedoms introduced by Ukiyo-e masters. Subjects are placed off center, silhouetted and cropped. There is light without shadows, flat areas of strong color, patterned surfaces and contrasting voids. Kobayashi has found a way to blend strong design aesthetic with an intimate characterization of his subject.

high-resolution images:
Milt Kobayashi / In Mood
Milt Kobayashi / Pastel Quiet

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Milt Kobayashi / In Mood

 

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Milt Kobayashi / Pastel Quiet

 

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PrintAustin 2017
KAREN KUNC + MONIKA MELER
January 13 - February 18, 2017

A spectrum of color and light connects Karen Kunc's woodcuts and Monika Meler's relief prints in this two-person exhibition. The span of time is central to both artists' imagery. For Kunc, the natural world is where she finds inspiration; Meler draws on place—referencing memories of her childhood in Poland and her immigration to the U.S.  Strong visual imagery and technical fluency have brought each artist international recognition in printmaking.

KAREN KUNC is the Willa Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is internationally known for her large scale, elaborately colored woodcut prints. Her imagery incorporates richly hued shapes with timeless textural language, leading to a sense of intimacy and detail, with the tactile resonance of wood, paper and impression.

"My works suggests extremes of weather and natural forces at work, a sense of the micro/macrocosm, set against a landscape or space, both wild and cultivated, intimate and unknowable. I am interested in the span of time it takes to wear away a canyon, build a mountain, the erosion forces that continually wash onto the plains, forming the earth, and ultimately, shaping the world."

The accomplished printmaker has received numerous awards including being recognized in 2007 as Printmaker Emeritus by the Southern Graphics Council.  She has taught workshops around the world and served as a visiting artist to over 100 institutions.

In 2013, Kunc founded Constellation Studios to pursue and pass on her passion for print, paper and bookmaking. The renowned Nebraska artist established this creative gallery, work space and professional classroom in a refurbished and historic building in Lincoln, Nebraska's Antelope Valley neighborhood.  Here, Kunc serves as mentor, artist, curator and community organizer, aiming to develop young artists, spur careers and cheer culture.

MONIKA MELER's selected works for the exhibition focus on Collected Memories and include several different print processes - diffused relief print, monotypes, and handcut stencil relief prints.
 
"My artwork," says Meler, "examines actual and constructed memory, especially as it related to my upbringing in Poland and immigration to the United States, my recollections of the places I occupied in Poland and in my initial years in Chicago. Rebecca Solnit captures my immigration experience in The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness when she writes, "The thing we call a place is the intersection of many changing forces passing through, whirling around, mixing, dissolving, and exploding in a fixed location."

"Memory is liminal. Remembering a place is not an act of recollecting the actual place but our last memory of that place. Therefore, my work is often an abstraction of a place, space, building, folktale, or event that had a lasting impression. I use images that reference my father's elaborate gardens, my mother's colorful textiles, the Slavic folktale of the Baba Jaga, and the majestic skyscrapers of Chicago. Images repeat, change direction and dominance. All of these actions mimic the actions of memory."

Monika Meler is originally from Brodnica, Poland, and earned her BFA from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. She continued her studies at Purdue University, where she earned an M.A., followed with an M.F.A from the Tyler school of art, Temple University. While at Tyler, Monika spent a year studying in Rome, Italy. Monika is an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California.

high-resolution images:
Karen Kunc / Place Naming
Monika Meler / The Tower

 

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Karen Kunc / Place Naming

 

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Monika Meler / The Tower

2016

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SHAWN CAMP / Angle of Refraction
November 12 through December 17, 2016

In recent bodies of work, Shawn Camp has migrated from large abstract imagery rendered in an impasto style to an exploration of smooth, almost metallic surfaces based on oblique rectangles, linear edges that cut across the panel, and the refractive qualities of light. The transition evolved out of Camp’s earlier light box installations that combined palette knife impasto mark-making on plexiglass with an underside of glazed colors that allowed patterns of light to stream through.

In his artist statement, Camp describes the interactive nature of the engaging new work featured in this show: "These are paintings that place the viewer in a contradictory sense of space and color through countless layers of thinly glazed transparent pigment. Their meditative, expansive surfaces convey a sense of atmosphere and depth that mitigates the physical reality of the paintings themselves. The subtle refractive quality of the transparent layers of color transform as the viewing angle changes - a symbolic parallax that reveals itself over the course of time."

The current series, Angle of Refraction, explores in depth these smooth, glazed surfaces broken by masked-out shapes and lines. To achieve the glass-like sheen, Camp builds layer upon layer of transparent paint. Applied by brush, the glazed surface is sanded repeatedly throughout the entire process. A single layer "does almost nothing," says Camp. "It's only after 20 or 30 layers that you start to see the subtle complexity of the colors."

Camp received his MFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, after completing a BFA in Painting and BS in Psychology from The University of Idaho. He currently teaches Painting at The School of Art and Design at Texas State University.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with EAST 2016
November 12-13 & 19-20 from 11am-6pm

high-resolution images:
The Absolute of the Mystics
The Angle of Incidence

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Shawn Camp / The Absolute of the Mystics

 

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Shawn Camp / The Angle of Incidence

 

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triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together
MARC BURCKHARDT + KEN HALE + KIRK TATOM
October 21 through November 19, 2016

The gallery will showcase the most recent work of three featured artists: Marc Burckhardt, Ken Hale and Kirk Tatom. The audience is invited to view the presentation as three distinct exhibitions and explore the themes, references, and stylistic elements adopted by each artist in triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together.

 

MARC BURCKHARDT / Allegorical Narratives

Marc Burckhardt's paintings are simultaneously foreign and familiar. Influenced by German Renaissance masters, his poignant work explores private realities and universal themes, as in Fates, which like all of the artist’s imagery challenges the viewer's perceptions. Burckhardt's recent works include those inspired by literature and mythology, including Petrarch’s Triumphs, the lyrical poem from the early Italian Renaissance. Working between studios in Austin, Texas, and Bremen, Germany, his extensive research has led to a series of allegorical paintings that reflect his personal connection to classical themes.

 

KEN HALE / Earthly Delights

In Hale's 2016 series Earthly Delights, floral motifs and the painterly gouache monotype process create beautiful, intricate and tactile images. The juxtaposition of diverse imagery forces the viewer to study both the strange familiarity and aestheticism of each piece through references to European masters of the 15th–18th centuries. The matte floral compositions are superimposed over glossy computer manipulated reproductions of old master paintings by Rubens, Bosch, Cole, Brueghel and others, adding a conundrum for the viewer who attempts to decipher the works. The series title is derived from Hieronymus Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights.

 

KIRK TATOM / Seam of Light

Kirk Tatom's artistic career merges the diverse skills he has mastered. For nearly 20 years, he was one of the foremost carvers of stone in Santa Fe. In 1997 he put down the chisel and picked up the paint brush. A sculptural spirit remains in his paintings, seen especially in the carved outline of a stream or the rugged cracks of a cliff. Drawn to the tranquility of place, his compositions gravitate to rural picturesque landscapes while light illuminates the tonal nature of his work. Process, derived from his early training as a printmaker, drives his approach. He spends hours setting the mood as he prepares the under layers with glowing, translucent surfaces. The darker, highly saturated color is applied last, creating the detail and providing those hints of form that reference his talents as a stone carver. Tatom resides in southern Arizona and spends part of the year traveling and painting in California.

high-resolution images:
Marc Burckhardt / Fates
Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2
Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

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Marc Burckhardt / Fates

 

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Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2

 

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Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

 

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RENÉ ALVARADO
September 16 through October 29, 2016

As an artist, Alvarado returns to the cultural narratives of his childhood. His imagery embraces the symbolism, metaphors, folklore and traditional icons of his Mexican roots. Yet, "while he expresses these cultural identities, his work cannot be considered simply a form of regional expressionism," says Dr. Enrique Cortazar, former Director of the Instituto de Mexico in San Antonio. "Rather, thanks to the expressive depth and honest sensitivity, his work approaches a true universal dimension . . . within a language of forms, colors and artistic expression, [Alvarado] transports us from the flavor of locale to a universal perspective. Here borders do not exist."

Alvarado's visual narratives draw on his strong familial ties. Layer by layer, the metaphorical assemblage of color, texture and figural forms unveil a range of human emotions that instinctively flow from his creative process. Following the death of his father, he has explored how the absence of one affects those remaining. The Madonna figure assumes “the role of parental guidance while other imagery suggests the beautiful imprints of lessons my father shared. Organic references—a thread that runs throughout Alvarado's work—bring to mind his father's love of the botanical world of the desert terrain in his nature Mexico and that of his adopted landscape of West Texas.

Two signature pieces anchor the exhibition. The first, Madagascar Cactus, pays homage to Alvarado’s father and his agrarian roots. In Loyalty and Conversation in the Spring, the artist focuses on the symbolic Madonna and her dog set in a lush garden, symbolic of the "beautiful imprints of lessons … shared." Both paintings are deeply personal as is much of the artist’s work.

 

high-resolution images:
Madagascar Cactus
Loyalty and Conversation in the Spring

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Madagascar Cactus
oil on canvas / 40 x 30 in.

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Loyalty and Conversation in the Spring
oil on canvas / 48 x 48 in.

 

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ENGAGED IN CONVERSATION:
KATIE MARATTA + SYDNEY YEAGER
A visual presentation by two Austin artists 
August 10 through September 10, 2016

The conversation between Sydney Yeager and Katie Maratta began in late 2015, and the enthusiasm built as the two found similarities in their visual language. Soon the duo declared, “We want to do an exhibition together.” It was not until Sydney arrived with a set of minimally painted color fields and Katie unveiled a series of cloudscapes that I began to grasp the vision percolating in their creative minds.

In a signature piece, Maratta has taken her linear format to the extreme with an 8 foot long, 1.5 inch high panel that depicts movement hovering just above the horizon line. In a major, large scale painting, Yeager has created a subtly washed, smoky yet illuminated textural surface that invokes a calm, meditative mood. These are just two of the inviting works that confirm both artists have pushed the boundaries of the expected and broadened their visual vocabulary. Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to showcase the two artists engaged in conversation with side by side shows.

SYDNEY YEAGER / In Other Words

The title, In Other Words, is "stolen" from a novel by Jhumpa Lahiri. Lahiri wrote the novel in Italian, a newly learned language. Likewise, the paintings and drawings in this show are a different painting language, not a language that I usually "speak". The work consists of fields of minimal color; for me, quite a different way of developing a painting as my paintings are usually marked by large gestural elements in a minimally painted field.

I came to this work naturally, gradually realizing that I was spending as much time and thought on the stained "fields" as I was on the focal points or "figures" in my paintings. When several people expressed an interest in these minimal fields, I jumped at a chance to create a body of work that was devoted to the stains, devoid of "figures".

As I considered a possible pairing with another artist in the gallery's stable, Katie Maratta came instantly to mind. Her haunting West Texas landscapes seemed to have a similar emptiness, with large open skies dominating the tiny earthbound structure peopled only by light. Her palette is equally minimal, consisting largely of grays with only touches of color, mostly metallic golds. We seem to share an interest in the issues of presence and absence.

Although I am not involved specifically with landscape, Katie's work resonates with me. I am anxious to see what happens when this particular body of my work is paired with hers. I wonder if landscape will become more evident in my own work. I’m not at all sure if this is an avenue I will continue to explore, but I am so grateful to have the opportunity to wander.

KATIE MARATTA / The Next Small Thing

What my work shares with Sydney's is the idea of an open-ended narrative. While Sydney approaches the issue abstractly and I realistically, the tonalities, movement, and use of space that we both play with give the viewer the means to resolve the pictorial story in his or her own way.

Not to mention, there are sections of her paintings that I can choose to read as almost landscape-ish, and, likewise, sections of my panels that approach pure abstract shapes. It’s only in their particular context that each moment stays put.

I continue to be fascinated with the horizon line - especially the tension that is created not only by the perceived line between earth and sky, but the tension generated between the viewer and the pictorial space, a tension that echoes my experience of the literal landscape and the depiction of that landscape in miniature form.

Recently, I have been exaggerating that tension by obscuring the horizon line. Messing with the absolute linear narrative of the piece introduces a textural layer, a layer that violates in a small way the convention progression—the one thing after another—with a moment of confusion. Just like in everyday life.

high-resolution images:
Katie Maratta / Pier (detail)
Sydney Yeager / Le Soir

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Maratta / Pier (detail)
mixed media drawing on panel / 2 x 36 in.

 

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Yeager / Le Soir
oil on linen / 60 x 48 in.

 

 

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CONNECTIONS
Monotypes + Painting Duets by Tony Saladino
June 17- July 23, 2016

Tony Saladino moves with ease between painting and printmaking. Movement and fluidity are the foundation for both as he strives for spontaneity in his mark making. The upcoming exhibition presents a new series of monotypes with hand coloring that emphasizes his mastery of color and form.

"I begin with color and form to create compositional elements that speak to each other across the pictorial plane," he says. Dots, lines and borders between spaces emulate what might be seen on maps. My love of maps is driven by the way we translate what is real and experienced in travel to what we can see on another level. The pictorial elements serve as vehicles to transport us from one place to another in thought, emotion and spirit."

Alongside the monotypes are pairs of paintings rendered in square formats, ranging from twelve inches to thirty inches. Each set showcases two individual paintings that come together in conversation. Again, the artist acknowledges his preoccupations with developing the theme of "connections"—physical, emotional and spiritual.

 

high-resolution images:
Puente II

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Puente II
monotype with hand coloring / 30 x 40 in. paper size

 

 

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AUTOMOTIVE
Paintings by Christopher St. Leger
April 22 - May 28, 2016

Long devoted to watercolor, Christopher St. Leger turned his creative exploration to painting in oil in early 2015. Instinctively, he has drawn on his application of a water-based medium to the process of painting in oils to create luminous surfaces on canvas and panel.

St. Leger chooses to paint from a low perspective, "as from a car's headlights," he notes.  AUTOMOTIVE, the show’s title, references this angle and suggests a momentary view from a car window. Compositionally, he adheres to the reality of perspective while stylistically embracing a more expressionistic exposure creating what he calls an automotive pastoral . . . exploring a new city without a map. A joyride of attention on the visual.

St. Leger continues to explore the enigmatic connection of mood and place as he captures fleeting urban views and cities he knows well.  Regardless the locale—Chicago or New York, Budapest or Vienna—he invokes a dialogue between artist and surroundings, between a cautious being and an irrational force.

high-resolution image:
Nova

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Nova
oil on panel / 48 x 45 in.

 

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI: New Works
March 18 - April 16, 2016

Time stands still in Milt Kobayashi's urban interiors. Yet, the expressive narrative flows and ebbs with a rhythmic cadence of color and brevity of brushstrokes. Masterfully, he distills the essence of an intimate moment or a late-night mood to the point that the imagery itself engages the audience in an intriguing dialogue. It is with the mere hint of detail that Kobayashi has perfected his fine art of subtlety.

A third generation Japanese American, Kobayashi blends the elements of oriental line, pattern and composition with a refreshing spontaneity. As a young illustrator in New York City, he frequented the Metropolitan Museum of Art to study the masters— Sargent, Chase, Duveneck, Vuillard, Velazquez. Even today, as a highly successful painter, he returns often to spend time with the artists of the 18th and 19th century who have influenced his own work.

Like Whistler before him, Kobayashi studied "ukiyo-e" prints by Japanese masters such as Hokusai, Sharaku, and Utamaro. He was drawn to their use of color harmonies, patterns, negative spaces, and especially their approach to composition and design. Here he found balance, a way to blend a strong design aesthetic with an intimate characterization of his subject.

high-resolution image:
Monique '16

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Monique '16
oil / 10 x 10 in.

 

 

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INTERSECTION / Karina Noel Hean + Koichi Yamamoto
January 16 through February 20, 2016

Karina Noel Hean's layered, collaged prints and Koichi Yamamoto's innovative, large-scale works come together in INTERSECTION, an exhibition presented in conjunction with PrintAustin 2016. The two artists bring varied print processes to their hybrid works. In unison, the show presents a fluid exchange of ideas and explores the possibilities open to contemporary printmakers.

KARINA NOEL HEAN's new series of collage work, underlines, layers a range of print processes: intaglio, relief and monotype. In creating the series, "my primary interest is contrast—the contrast between color set against black and white, the contrast of irregular monotype shapes and the crisp line work of intaglio, and lastly, the contrast that emerges when organic abstraction interacts with geometric structure."

Hean's imagery revels in the visual pleasures of the landscape suggesting a connection with place, both real and imagined. These imagined landscapes are un-traversable spaces but "drawn from observing terrain."

"The monoprints engage a new way of seeing what constitutes a captivating moment and place by moving through identity or specific reference to an analysis of structure. A certain play of various angles and shapes in coastline formations, rocky canyons, dilapidated buildings, or eroding jetties serve as an essential abstraction of a striking first-hand experience of time and place. Dramatic weather and quality of light often draw me to these specific moments andintersection-yamamoto-hikimen serve as the initial emotional inspiration. In underlines, the prints reveal and react to the event's internal form, rendering its energy with an intensity of interacting line and shape."

KOICHI YAMAMOTO is an artist who merges the traditional and contemporary by creating unique and innovative approaches to the language of printmaking. The journey of production requires a series of decisions and allows opportunity for discovery.

 "My newest prints examine relationships - first, our relationship with the environment and secondly, our relationship with other human beings. The first is embodied in the monotype prints, which are by their very nature unique, expressive, spontaneous, and intangible. These qualities allow me to create prints that are unpredictable but that include a sense of gravity, darkness and light.

high-resolution images:
Koichi Yamamoto / Hikimen
Karina Noel Hean / underline III

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Koichi Yamamoto / Hikimen

 

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Karina Noel Hean / underline III

 

   
2015

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JILL LEAR + KATIE MARATTA
April 24 – June 6, 2015

JILL LEAR's interest in trees has taken her to far parts of the world. Her expressive work is grounded in place as she seeks to discover the role a particular tree has played in its locale, reflected in her newest series, Witness Trees of Texas.


In the spring of 2014, she set out on a 1300-mile road trip to explore twenty historic Texas trees. In her studio, she began to pay homage to each in mixed media paintings on paper. Relying on varied perspectives, she conveys structure and hints at the history of each. Close up views speak to the trees' strength and endurance; as the lens pulls away, the expansive reach of branches is emphasized and accentuated by the movement of color. The project shows a more experimental use of color, with the palette being slightly muted and at the same time highly saturated.

KATIE MARATTA / "My typical landscapes are four feet long and one inch high. And if those four foot pieces are short stories, narratives of the Texas landscape that have to be "read" complete with rhythm and balance and suspense, the 2 inch by 3 inch works are haiku. They elevate the mundane, the over-looked. The smaller format allows me to concentrate on the moment. When they succeed, they allow the viewer to see something completely familiar in a brand new way. I refer to them as "sliders" because they are just the right size and they go down easy."

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2014

 

SHAWN CAMP: Equal and Opposite
October 17 - November 8, 2014

Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to present Equal and Opposite, a solo exhibition of new work by Austin artist Shawn Camp. The exhibition opens on Friday, October 17, with a reception for the artist from 6 to 8 pm. Equal and Opposite will be on view until November at the gallery's eastside location at the Flatbed Building.

In his newest exploration of light and surfaces, Camp continues to think in polarities as he addresses what arts writer Erin Keever calls "the existential back and forth of figuring out our place in the world."

"Equal and Opposite," says Camp, "is a collection of paintings that explore the boundary between the physical and the transcendent. Each is an aesthetic reaction to our tendency to comprehend reality through an elaborate construction of systems and precepts that divide our experience into diametric poles of existence."

 

high-resolution images:
Lightbox I (detail) in full light
Small Lightbox in medium light

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Lightbox I (detail) in full light

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Small Lightbox in medium light

 

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TONY SALADINO and KAREN HAWKINS
May 16 - June 14, 2014

Diverse in medium and direction, the current work by Mr. Saladino and Ms. Hawkins stands in contrast yet creates an integrated presentation of the intersection of form and movement. The exhibition will feature large scale abstracted paintings and monotypes by Saladino alongside sculptural installations created from decommissioned books by Karen Hawkins.

Working on flat surfaces, Tony Saladino moves with ease between painting and printmaking. Movement and fluidity are the foundation for both as he strives for spontaneity in his mark making. "Inspiration," he says, "comes from encountering the verticals and horizontals of a sometimes vast, other times immediate view. Although I call my current work abstract there are, to me, obvious markers or signs of what is real on the roadside or my studio yard."

A sculptor, Karen Hawkins' work explores "the book," a rapidly declining composition, and how, or whether, it remains purposeful in a digital age. "I begin changing the book's structure," she notes, "by expanding the physical properties of the book; folding, cutting and excavating it, rendering each page largely unreadable, and each book shape-shifted into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art."


high-resolution images:
Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

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Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
acrylic / 56 x 48 in.

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Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

 

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ALEKSANDER & LYUBA TITOVETS
April 25 - May 24, 2014

Gallery Shoal Creek will showcase new work by Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets in an exhibition which celebrates the classically trained duo's artistic success each has achieved in their adopted country.

In 1992, Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets left their homeland and the city of St. Petersburg to resettle in El Paso, Texas. Summarizing the couple's journey, a former professor of Aleksander's at the St. Petersburg University pointed out, "You got your education in Russia, but you became an artist in the United States." The two signature pieces for the show, Sunny Texas and Secret Garden, capture the life they have built for their family in the arid region of their adopted country.

Inspired by the light and landscape of two worlds, Aleksander's impressionistic work reveals his classical training while creating a warmth and energy reflective of the artist himself. Lyuba's talent lies in her visual narratives. The elements she gathers for a still life tell a story awash in vibrant colors, while her festive village scenes conjure the folklore of her childhood.

high-resolution images:
Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas

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Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

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Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

 

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