BUILDING FINE ART COLLECTIONS SINCE 1965

2017

 

TONY SALADINO
October 20 - November 22, 2017
Artist Reception / Friday, October 20, 6-8 pm

Sound in Time / Marks in Space
When sound becomes music and marks become art we can see and feel the effect of shared experience.

Tony Saladino has always felt a deep connection between music and the art that emerges from his creative process. In a series of 12 new works on canvas, the artist explores this connectivity.

The exhibition opens on Friday, October 20 at Gallery Shoal Creek with a reception for the artist and will be on view through November 22. Mr. Saladino and gallery owner Judith Taylor have worked closely together for over twenty-five years. While color has always been at the heart of Saladino's works—whether on canvas or paper—his mark marking has evolved from highly structured to loose and gestural.

In this collection, layering dominates while colors rise and fall with complexity.  Some works burst with energy and intensity as in Firebird and The Swan of Tuonela while others emphasize musical repetitions that inform several paintings in the series, such as On Listening to Glass' Etudes. In What Lies Beneath the Mountain, the flow of line and the mood of color achieve ultimate connectivity with the music of rising chamber music stars invoke, who have had an ongoing dialogue with Mr. Saladino as he completed the work for this show, and will be performing at The Austin Chamber Music Center's inaugural event in its A Moveable Feast concert series on October 19 in the gallery. The goal of the series is to fuse live chamber music with other art forms in an engaging environment. Artistic Director Michelle Schumann says, "This program represents the best of what collaboration can be: invoke and Tony Saladino are directly influencing each other and creating new works to be unveiled to a new audience. We're thrilled to see this project unfold and can't wait to see the reaction to this new art/ensemble/artist and how they interact within a new performance space. We're thrilled to see this project unfold and can't wait to see the reaction to this new art/ensemble/artist and how they interact within a new performance space."

From the Artist's Writings: 

My interest in music comes partly from trying to make paintings do the same for a viewer that music does for a listener. Music allows the composer to create in a non static way so that we can appreciate the composition in and over time. Visual artists have to put whatever time cogent material there is on the canvas in a way that is constrained to two dimensions. This is not to say that the artists' job is any harder—it's just different.

Others who have studied music see how close in structure it is to visual art. The elements of rhythm, tension, balance, repetition, and variation are so close in music and art that I wanted to study it more closely.

My work here tries to show how one artist is affected by listening to music and thinking about how it is made, then doing work that is visually based on that comparison. Some of the results show emotional response while others' are more intellectual. Yet others reflect how a painting might interpret a musical composition's theme.

Listening to music can take us back to the beginnings and forward to today to hear what was, and is in the minds of composers who grapple with composition in time as I do in space. Artists' work, we're told, should reflect the time in which they live, as well as their thoughts and emotions. Many artists make paintings that reflect the ethos of their time enhanced with their own commentary. I tend to stay within myself responding to the landscape or to ideas and questions of form, line and color. When I first saw the parallels of music and visual art shown in the mathematics of the Fibonacci number series, it was like an epiphany telling me that there is, indeed, order in the universe. Trying, as a novice, to learn more about music has given me new of ideas to explore.

Dr. Robert Greenberg in his Teaching Company course titled How to Listen to and Understand Great Music says "music as a universal nonverbal language allows us to tap into to the social, cultural and aesthetic traditions of different times and different places. And, in doing, so we become more aware of our shared humanity and the wisdom of others. Music allows us to transcend our own world and partake in completely different realities."

While I'm overwhelmed by the complexity of music, it's still a joy to listen to the masters and to try to see the form that's there and how it is so similar to the shape and flow of line or the mood of color in a painting. JFK said in June of 1963, "We breathe the same air." I hope that I am now more connected with all of you who have traveled this path and, like so many pilgrims we share a common goal—that of understanding better what music and art have to offer. It is in that sharing that we grow.

high-resolution image:
Tony Saladino / Firebird
Tony Saladino / What Lies Beneath the Mountain

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Tony Saladino / Firebird
Acrylic / 54" x 50"

 

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Tony Saladino / What Lies Beneath the Mountain
Acrylic / 54" x 48"

 

 

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CHRISTOPHER ST. LEGER
APPROACH / A Collection of Watercolors
September 15 - October 28, 2017
Artist Reception / Friday, September 15, 6-8 pm

Christopher St. Leger follows the tradition of illustrated journals as he captures "fleeting images of varied places [he] visits seasonally." The current portfolio takes the viewer from Austin, to places distant or remote, and back to Lockhart, Texas.

The exhibition's signature painting, baggy (Austin - Brazos St.) demonstrates St. Leger's compositional style of establishing place in background detail and then laying down pigments in pure form to produce a luminous, translucent quality central to his work. 

"Luminosity is the atmosphere and nature of watercolor," St. Leger says. "For me, it is what watercolor on paper wants, and what draws me to the medium. Watercolors develop much like a photograph. Each begins with a 'what if' and concludes by gently placing the brush down."

"In the last few years, I have returned to pure watercolor—no ink—and a succinct range of colors and tools, a back to basics way of working with less as I did when I first painted watercolors en plein air, on location, as a traveler."

St. Leger restricts his pigment use to eight colors in his current work. Some pigments stain the paper, most do not. "When I apply a wash, some color is lifted and some stays fixed," he notes. "It has taken me years to master pouring heavily saturated layers, knowing what is likely to stick and what can be pulled out with clean water.  It is more color that I used to dare.  Plus giving stage to one or two colors is a recent change."

Watercolor paintings rose to prominence, often in the form of illustrated journals, in Great Britain in the 18th and 19th century. The confluence of cultural, scientific and picturesque illustrations culminated in the celebration of watercolor as a distinctly English national art. 

Some watercolor artists illustrate their seductive encounters in travel while others travel specifically to seek out a new picture. "My travels involve little of the spectacular meaning as I don't look to conquer places. I prefer to explore new landscapes and cities without background information, without GPS, much preferring to feel lost. Traveling that is most dear to me gives little credit to the place as much as it does to the attitude of abandon."

"And over the past couple of years, I have been more curious of what is beyond my street and neighborhood here in Caldwell County, to look at it plainly through new eyes. I remind myself that despite the fact that there are so many things that this place is not, it is authentic. The challenge for me is to portray this quality."

high-resolution image:
Christopher St. Leger / baggy

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Christopher St. Leger / baggy (Austin - Brazos St)
Watercolor / 25" x 44.5"

 

 

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KAREN HAWKINS
KOICHI YAMAMOTO
August 18 - September 30, 2017
Artists' Reception / Friday, August 18, 6-8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek launches the fall season with solo exhibitions featuring two noted artists who have an established association with the gallery: KAREN HAWKINS and KOICHI YAMAMOTO. Exploration and experimentation dominate as each artist has developed a highly personal visual language and expresses devotion to a singular medium with infinite variations.

KAREN HAWKINS / How Many Journeys?
Holding a vintage book, Karen Hawkins is drawn to the sensory qualities of the volume and wonders, "how many journeys has this book taken?"   In our digital age, books are rapidly becoming objects on a shelf. As an artist, Hawkins' goal is to propel the objectivity of each decommissioned book by transforming and reinterpreting its form. In deconstructing and constructing, Hawkins creates meandering, organic forms—each with a meditative aspect. Recent jelly roll assemblages are rendered in un-dyed, natural tones of aged paper while sculpted book forms are presented as hanging pillars as well as wall installations.

"I begin by expanding the physical properties of the book: folding, cutting and excavating it, rendering each page largely unreadable, and each book shifts into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art. As the meaning of each book is subjugated to this objectification process, a shifting beauty transpires, aside from any language or text or etching held between the endpapers. As the type transforms from a recognizable symbol to a simple visual mark, it no longer references a known cue, but introduces a new, visual language."

Karen Hawkins is a graduate of the University of Texas Austin Fine Arts program and lives and works in Austin. She is active in the city's art community and currently serves on the Board of Trustees of The Contemporary Austin.

KOICHI YAMAMOTO / New Territory
Engraving has been a primary medium in Eastern Europe for centuries, and it was there that artist Koichi Yamamoto's interest in it began. The intense physicality and slowness of this specific intaglio process resonated with the highly skilled printmaker. The last five years of the artist's practice has been devoted to developing a unique technique of creating bisymmetrical imagery via traditionally engraved copper plates. The current exhibition highlights the new territory into which this important artist has ventured both physically and creatively.

This spring, while on sabbatical from his teaching position at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, Yamamoto had the opportunity to pursue his printmaking at three very different residencies, each of which broadened the scope of his work. On Kauai Island in Hawaii, the artist incorporated images from naval architecture. The winds of the Mojave Desert inspired the artist to create kites out of his prints while at Joshua Tree National Park. Research into Moorish architecture in Southern Spain and Morocco led Yamamoto to incorporate color into his oeuvre. In reference to the collective experiences, he notes, "To share and to communicate requires a vehicle. Kites are my vehicle and printmaking my language."

Koichi Yamamoto, born and raised in Japan, came to the U.S. as a high school student. He currently teaches at the University of Tennessee Knoxville where he is Associate Professor in Printmaking in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is a graduate of the University of Alberta (MFA 1999) and Pacific Northwest College of Art (BFA 1992). His work is recognized internationally, and he maintains an active exhibition schedule in the U.S. and abroad.

high-resolution images:
Karen Hawkins / Jelly Rolls
Karen Hawkins / Sculpted Book Forms

Koichi Yamamoto / Kite Flying at Joshua Tree National Park
Koichi Yamamoto / Floating Architecture Series no. 25
Koichi Yamamoto / Sabamaru

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Karen Hawkins / Jelly Rolls
Rolled book pages

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Karen Hawkins / Sculpted Book Forms

 

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Koichi Yamamoto / Kite flying at Joshua Tree National Park

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Koichi Yamamoto / Floating Architecture Series no. 25
intaglio / 16 x 20 inches

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Koichi Yamamoto / Sabamaru
(diptych)
monotype / 72 x 36 inches

 

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JILL LEAR
Spontaneity within Structure
May 19 - June 24, 2017

Jill Lear is known for her large-scale mixed media renderings of magnificent trees identified by their coordinates. In these, she expresses the landscape as a particular, defined and measured place.

"It starts with a single tree in the landscape, assigned its latitude and longitude," notes the artist. "Then the investigation begins. A transcription of not only the experience of being in and thinking about Nature, but also about the way in which we process the world around us, literally."

Lear's charcoal lines and graphite marks on paper "serve not only as outline of form but as a map delineating the tracks of trunks and branches, serving as descriptors of volume," writes Kristin Poole. She wants us to see not just a tree but "thickness, areas of light and the energy where lines intersect. She asks us to see form but also the spaces between forms."

high-resolution image:
Jill Lear / Erythrina Caffra XLIV

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Jill Lear / Erythrina Caffra XLIV
Mixed media on paper on 4 panels / 60 x 44 in.

 

 

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The Aesthetics of
MILT KOBAYASHI
March 17- April 15, 2017

Time stands still in Mr. Kobayashi's quiet moments, yet the expressive narrative ebbs and flows with a cadence of color and distinctive brushwork. Over the course of his career, he has perfected his fine art of subtlety and adopted a growing freedom in his use of color. To describe his artistic aesthetic, Mr. Kobayashi references the Russian-born painter, Nicholai Fechin: "the important thing is not the object painted, but how the canvas is filled through the filter of the artist's creative idea."

Gallery Shoal Creek has represented Milt Kobayashi since 1984, hosting his first solo exhibition outside of New York City in 1989. Over the years, he has garnered national and international attention. The gallery is proud to be a part of the legacy that Mr. Kobayashi has established, placing his work in private collections across the US, Canada, and the UK.

high-resolution image:
Milt Kobayashi / In Mood

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Milt Kobayashi / In Mood

 

 

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PrintAustin 2017
KAREN KUNC + MONIKA MELER
January 13 - February 18, 2017

A spectrum of color and light connects Karen Kunc's woodcuts and Monika Meler's relief prints in this two-person exhibition. The span of time is central to both artists' imagery. For Kunc, the natural world is where she finds inspiration; Meler draws on place—referencing memories of her childhood in Poland and her immigration to the U.S.  Strong visual imagery and technical fluency have brought each artist international recognition in printmaking.

KAREN KUNC is the Willa Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is internationally known for her large scale, elaborately colored woodcut prints. Her imagery incorporates richly hued shapes with timeless textural language, leading to a sense of intimacy and detail, with the tactile resonance of wood, paper and impression.

MONIKA MELER's selected works for the exhibition focus on Collected Memories and include several different print processes - diffused relief print, monotypes, and handcut stencil relief prints. Monika is an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California.

high-resolution images:
Karen Kunc / Place Naming
Monika Meler / The Tower

 

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Karen Kunc / Place Naming

 

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Monika Meler / The Tower

2016

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SHAWN CAMP / Angle of Refraction
November 12 through December 17, 2016

In recent bodies of work, Shawn Camp has migrated from large abstract imagery rendered in an impasto style to an exploration of smooth, almost metallic surfaces based on oblique rectangles, linear edges that cut across the panel, and the refractive qualities of light. The transition evolved out of Camp’s earlier light box installations that combined palette knife impasto mark-making on plexiglass with an underside of glazed colors that allowed patterns of light to stream through.

In his artist statement, Camp describes the interactive nature of the engaging new work featured in this show: "These are paintings that place the viewer in a contradictory sense of space and color through countless layers of thinly glazed transparent pigment. Their meditative, expansive surfaces convey a sense of atmosphere and depth that mitigates the physical reality of the paintings themselves. The subtle refractive quality of the transparent layers of color transform as the viewing angle changes - a symbolic parallax that reveals itself over the course of time."

The current series, Angle of Refraction, explores in depth these smooth, glazed surfaces broken by masked-out shapes and lines. To achieve the glass-like sheen, Camp builds layer upon layer of transparent paint. Applied by brush, the glazed surface is sanded repeatedly throughout the entire process. A single layer "does almost nothing," says Camp. "It's only after 20 or 30 layers that you start to see the subtle complexity of the colors."

Camp received his MFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, after completing a BFA in Painting and BS in Psychology from The University of Idaho. He currently teaches Painting at The School of Art and Design at Texas State University.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with EAST 2016
November 12-13 & 19-20 from 11am-6pm

high-resolution images:
The Absolute of the Mystics
The Angle of Incidence

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Shawn Camp / The Absolute of the Mystics

 

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Shawn Camp / The Angle of Incidence

 

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triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together
MARC BURCKHARDT + KEN HALE + KIRK TATOM
October 21 through November 19, 2016

The gallery will showcase the most recent work of three featured artists: Marc Burckhardt, Ken Hale and Kirk Tatom. The audience is invited to view the presentation as three distinct exhibitions and explore the themes, references, and stylistic elements adopted by each artist in triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together.

 

MARC BURCKHARDT / Allegorical Narratives

Marc Burckhardt's paintings are simultaneously foreign and familiar. Influenced by German Renaissance masters, his poignant work explores private realities and universal themes, as in Fates, which like all of the artist’s imagery challenges the viewer's perceptions. Burckhardt's recent works include those inspired by literature and mythology, including Petrarch’s Triumphs, the lyrical poem from the early Italian Renaissance. Working between studios in Austin, Texas, and Bremen, Germany, his extensive research has led to a series of allegorical paintings that reflect his personal connection to classical themes.

 

KEN HALE / Earthly Delights

In Hale's 2016 series Earthly Delights, floral motifs and the painterly gouache monotype process create beautiful, intricate and tactile images. The juxtaposition of diverse imagery forces the viewer to study both the strange familiarity and aestheticism of each piece through references to European masters of the 15th–18th centuries. The matte floral compositions are superimposed over glossy computer manipulated reproductions of old master paintings by Rubens, Bosch, Cole, Brueghel and others, adding a conundrum for the viewer who attempts to decipher the works. The series title is derived from Hieronymus Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights.

 

KIRK TATOM / Seam of Light

Kirk Tatom's artistic career merges the diverse skills he has mastered. For nearly 20 years, he was one of the foremost carvers of stone in Santa Fe. In 1997 he put down the chisel and picked up the paint brush. A sculptural spirit remains in his paintings, seen especially in the carved outline of a stream or the rugged cracks of a cliff. Drawn to the tranquility of place, his compositions gravitate to rural picturesque landscapes while light illuminates the tonal nature of his work. Process, derived from his early training as a printmaker, drives his approach. He spends hours setting the mood as he prepares the under layers with glowing, translucent surfaces. The darker, highly saturated color is applied last, creating the detail and providing those hints of form that reference his talents as a stone carver. Tatom resides in southern Arizona and spends part of the year traveling and painting in California.

high-resolution images:
Marc Burckhardt / Fates
Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2
Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

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Marc Burckhardt / Fates

 

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Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2

 

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Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

 

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RENÉ ALVARADO
September 16 through October 29, 2016

As an artist, Alvarado returns to the cultural narratives of his childhood. His imagery embraces the symbolism, metaphors, folklore and traditional icons of his Mexican roots. Yet, "while he expresses these cultural identities, his work cannot be considered simply a form of regional expressionism," says Dr. Enrique Cortazar, former Director of the Instituto de Mexico in San Antonio. "Rather, thanks to the expressive depth and honest sensitivity, his work approaches a true universal dimension . . . within a language of forms, colors and artistic expression, [Alvarado] transports us from the flavor of locale to a universal perspective. Here borders do not exist."

Alvarado's visual narratives draw on his strong familial ties. Layer by layer, the metaphorical assemblage of color, texture and figural forms unveil a range of human emotions that instinctively flow from his creative process. Following the death of his father, he has explored how the absence of one affects those remaining. The Madonna figure assumes “the role of parental guidance while other imagery suggests the beautiful imprints of lessons my father shared. Organic references—a thread that runs throughout Alvarado's work—bring to mind his father's love of the botanical world of the desert terrain in his nature Mexico and that of his adopted landscape of West Texas.

high-resolution image:
Madagascar Cactus

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Madagascar Cactus
oil on canvas / 40 x 30 in.

 

 

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ENGAGED IN CONVERSATION:
KATIE MARATTA + SYDNEY YEAGER
A visual presentation by two Austin artists 
August 10 through September 10, 2016

The conversation between Sydney Yeager and Katie Maratta began in late 2015, and the enthusiasm built as the two found similarities in their visual language. Soon the duo declared, “We want to do an exhibition together.” It was not until Sydney arrived with a set of minimally painted color fields and Katie unveiled a series of cloudscapes that I began to grasp the vision percolating in their creative minds.

In a signature piece, Maratta has taken her linear format to the extreme with an 8 foot long, 1.5 inch high panel that depicts movement hovering just above the horizon line. In a major, large scale painting, Yeager has created a subtly washed, smoky yet illuminated textural surface that invokes a calm, meditative mood. These are just two of the inviting works that confirm both artists have pushed the boundaries of the expected and broadened their visual vocabulary. Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to showcase the two artists engaged in conversation with side by side shows.

SYDNEY YEAGER / In Other Words

The title, In Other Words, is "stolen" from a novel by Jhumpa Lahiri. Lahiri wrote the novel in Italian, a newly learned language. Likewise, the paintings and drawings in this show are a different painting language, not a language that I usually "speak". The work consists of fields of minimal color; for me, quite a different way of developing a painting as my paintings are usually marked by large gestural elements in a minimally painted field.

I came to this work naturally, gradually realizing that I was spending as much time and thought on the stained "fields" as I was on the focal points or "figures" in my paintings. When several people expressed an interest in these minimal fields, I jumped at a chance to create a body of work that was devoted to the stains, devoid of "figures".

As I considered a possible pairing with another artist in the gallery's stable, Katie Maratta came instantly to mind. Her haunting West Texas landscapes seemed to have a similar emptiness, with large open skies dominating the tiny earthbound structure peopled only by light. Her palette is equally minimal, consisting largely of grays with only touches of color, mostly metallic golds. We seem to share an interest in the issues of presence and absence.

Although I am not involved specifically with landscape, Katie's work resonates with me. I am anxious to see what happens when this particular body of my work is paired with hers. I wonder if landscape will become more evident in my own work. I’m not at all sure if this is an avenue I will continue to explore, but I am so grateful to have the opportunity to wander.

KATIE MARATTA / The Next Small Thing

What my work shares with Sydney's is the idea of an open-ended narrative. While Sydney approaches the issue abstractly and I realistically, the tonalities, movement, and use of space that we both play with give the viewer the means to resolve the pictorial story in his or her own way.

Not to mention, there are sections of her paintings that I can choose to read as almost landscape-ish, and, likewise, sections of my panels that approach pure abstract shapes. It’s only in their particular context that each moment stays put.

I continue to be fascinated with the horizon line - especially the tension that is created not only by the perceived line between earth and sky, but the tension generated between the viewer and the pictorial space, a tension that echoes my experience of the literal landscape and the depiction of that landscape in miniature form.

Recently, I have been exaggerating that tension by obscuring the horizon line. Messing with the absolute linear narrative of the piece introduces a textural layer, a layer that violates in a small way the convention progression—the one thing after another—with a moment of confusion. Just like in everyday life.

high-resolution images:
Katie Maratta / Pier (detail)
Sydney Yeager / Le Soir

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Maratta / Pier (detail)
mixed media drawing on panel / 2 x 36 in.

 

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Yeager / Le Soir
oil on linen / 60 x 48 in.

 

 

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CONNECTIONS
Monotypes + Painting Duets by Tony Saladino
June 17- July 23, 2016

Tony Saladino moves with ease between painting and printmaking. Movement and fluidity are the foundation for both as he strives for spontaneity in his mark making. The upcoming exhibition presents a new series of monotypes with hand coloring that emphasizes his mastery of color and form.

"I begin with color and form to create compositional elements that speak to each other across the pictorial plane," he says. Dots, lines and borders between spaces emulate what might be seen on maps. My love of maps is driven by the way we translate what is real and experienced in travel to what we can see on another level. The pictorial elements serve as vehicles to transport us from one place to another in thought, emotion and spirit."

Alongside the monotypes are pairs of paintings rendered in square formats, ranging from twelve inches to thirty inches. Each set showcases two individual paintings that come together in conversation. Again, the artist acknowledges his preoccupations with developing the theme of "connections"—physical, emotional and spiritual.

 

high-resolution images:
Puente II

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Puente II
monotype with hand coloring / 30 x 40 in. paper size

 

 

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AUTOMOTIVE
Paintings by Christopher St. Leger
April 22 - May 28, 2016

Long devoted to watercolor, Christopher St. Leger turned his creative exploration to painting in oil in early 2015. Instinctively, he has drawn on his application of a water-based medium to the process of painting in oils to create luminous surfaces on canvas and panel.

St. Leger chooses to paint from a low perspective, "as from a car's headlights," he notes.  AUTOMOTIVE, the show’s title, references this angle and suggests a momentary view from a car window. Compositionally, he adheres to the reality of perspective while stylistically embracing a more expressionistic exposure creating what he calls an automotive pastoral . . . exploring a new city without a map. A joyride of attention on the visual.

St. Leger continues to explore the enigmatic connection of mood and place as he captures fleeting urban views and cities he knows well.  Regardless the locale—Chicago or New York, Budapest or Vienna—he invokes a dialogue between artist and surroundings, between a cautious being and an irrational force.

high-resolution image:
Nova

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Nova
oil on panel / 48 x 45 in.

 

 

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MILT KOBAYASHI: New Works
March 18 - April 16, 2016

Time stands still in Milt Kobayashi's urban interiors. Yet, the expressive narrative flows and ebbs with a rhythmic cadence of color and brevity of brushstrokes. Masterfully, he distills the essence of an intimate moment or a late-night mood to the point that the imagery itself engages the audience in an intriguing dialogue. It is with the mere hint of detail that Kobayashi has perfected his fine art of subtlety.

A third generation Japanese American, Kobayashi blends the elements of oriental line, pattern and composition with a refreshing spontaneity. As a young illustrator in New York City, he frequented the Metropolitan Museum of Art to study the masters— Sargent, Chase, Duveneck, Vuillard, Velazquez. Even today, as a highly successful painter, he returns often to spend time with the artists of the 18th and 19th century who have influenced his own work.

Like Whistler before him, Kobayashi studied "ukiyo-e" prints by Japanese masters such as Hokusai, Sharaku, and Utamaro. He was drawn to their use of color harmonies, patterns, negative spaces, and especially their approach to composition and design. Here he found balance, a way to blend a strong design aesthetic with an intimate characterization of his subject.

high-resolution image:
Monique '16

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Monique '16
oil / 10 x 10 in.

 

 

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INTERSECTION / Karina Noel Hean + Koichi Yamamoto
January 16 through February 20, 2016

Karina Noel Hean's layered, collaged prints and Koichi Yamamoto's innovative, large-scale works come together in INTERSECTION, an exhibition presented in conjunction with PrintAustin 2016. The two artists bring varied print processes to their hybrid works. In unison, the show presents a fluid exchange of ideas and explores the possibilities open to contemporary printmakers.

KARINA NOEL HEAN's new series of collage work, underlines, layers a range of print processes: intaglio, relief and monotype. In creating the series, "my primary interest is contrast—the contrast between color set against black and white, the contrast of irregular monotype shapes and the crisp line work of intaglio, and lastly, the contrast that emerges when organic abstraction interacts with geometric structure."

Hean's imagery revels in the visual pleasures of the landscape suggesting a connection with place, both real and imagined. These imagined landscapes are un-traversable spaces but "drawn from observing terrain."

"The monoprints engage a new way of seeing what constitutes a captivating moment and place by moving through identity or specific reference to an analysis of structure. A certain play of various angles and shapes in coastline formations, rocky canyons, dilapidated buildings, or eroding jetties serve as an essential abstraction of a striking first-hand experience of time and place. Dramatic weather and quality of light often draw me to these specific moments andintersection-yamamoto-hikimen serve as the initial emotional inspiration. In underlines, the prints reveal and react to the event's internal form, rendering its energy with an intensity of interacting line and shape."

KOICHI YAMAMOTO is an artist who merges the traditional and contemporary by creating unique and innovative approaches to the language of printmaking. The journey of production requires a series of decisions and allows opportunity for discovery.

 "My newest prints examine relationships - first, our relationship with the environment and secondly, our relationship with other human beings. The first is embodied in the monotype prints, which are by their very nature unique, expressive, spontaneous, and intangible. These qualities allow me to create prints that are unpredictable but that include a sense of gravity, darkness and light.

high-resolution images:
Koichi Yamamoto / Hikimen
Karina Noel Hean / underline III

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Koichi Yamamoto / Hikimen

 

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Karina Noel Hean / underline III

 

   
2015

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JILL LEAR + KATIE MARATTA
April 24 – June 6, 2015

JILL LEAR's interest in trees has taken her to far parts of the world. Her expressive work is grounded in place as she seeks to discover the role a particular tree has played in its locale, reflected in her newest series, Witness Trees of Texas.


In the spring of 2014, she set out on a 1300-mile road trip to explore twenty historic Texas trees. In her studio, she began to pay homage to each in mixed media paintings on paper. Relying on varied perspectives, she conveys structure and hints at the history of each. Close up views speak to the trees' strength and endurance; as the lens pulls away, the expansive reach of branches is emphasized and accentuated by the movement of color. The project shows a more experimental use of color, with the palette being slightly muted and at the same time highly saturated.

KATIE MARATTA / "My typical landscapes are four feet long and one inch high. And if those four foot pieces are short stories, narratives of the Texas landscape that have to be "read" complete with rhythm and balance and suspense, the 2 inch by 3 inch works are haiku. They elevate the mundane, the over-looked. The smaller format allows me to concentrate on the moment. When they succeed, they allow the viewer to see something completely familiar in a brand new way. I refer to them as "sliders" because they are just the right size and they go down easy."

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2014

 

SHAWN CAMP: Equal and Opposite
October 17 - November 8, 2014

Gallery Shoal Creek is pleased to present Equal and Opposite, a solo exhibition of new work by Austin artist Shawn Camp. The exhibition opens on Friday, October 17, with a reception for the artist from 6 to 8 pm. Equal and Opposite will be on view until November at the gallery's eastside location at the Flatbed Building.

In his newest exploration of light and surfaces, Camp continues to think in polarities as he addresses what arts writer Erin Keever calls "the existential back and forth of figuring out our place in the world."

"Equal and Opposite," says Camp, "is a collection of paintings that explore the boundary between the physical and the transcendent. Each is an aesthetic reaction to our tendency to comprehend reality through an elaborate construction of systems and precepts that divide our experience into diametric poles of existence."

 

high-resolution images:
Lightbox I (detail) in full light
Small Lightbox in medium light

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Lightbox I (detail) in full light

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Small Lightbox in medium light

 

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TONY SALADINO and KAREN HAWKINS
May 16 - June 14, 2014

Diverse in medium and direction, the current work by Mr. Saladino and Ms. Hawkins stands in contrast yet creates an integrated presentation of the intersection of form and movement. The exhibition will feature large scale abstracted paintings and monotypes by Saladino alongside sculptural installations created from decommissioned books by Karen Hawkins.

Working on flat surfaces, Tony Saladino moves with ease between painting and printmaking. Movement and fluidity are the foundation for both as he strives for spontaneity in his mark making. "Inspiration," he says, "comes from encountering the verticals and horizontals of a sometimes vast, other times immediate view. Although I call my current work abstract there are, to me, obvious markers or signs of what is real on the roadside or my studio yard."

A sculptor, Karen Hawkins' work explores "the book," a rapidly declining composition, and how, or whether, it remains purposeful in a digital age. "I begin changing the book's structure," she notes, "by expanding the physical properties of the book; folding, cutting and excavating it, rendering each page largely unreadable, and each book shape-shifted into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art."


high-resolution images:
Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

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Tony Saladino / Arabesque II
acrylic / 56 x 48 in.

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Karen Hawkins / Totem Installation

 

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ALEKSANDER & LYUBA TITOVETS
April 25 - May 24, 2014

Gallery Shoal Creek will showcase new work by Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets in an exhibition which celebrates the classically trained duo's artistic success each has achieved in their adopted country.

In 1992, Aleksander and Lyuba Titovets left their homeland and the city of St. Petersburg to resettle in El Paso, Texas. Summarizing the couple's journey, a former professor of Aleksander's at the St. Petersburg University pointed out, "You got your education in Russia, but you became an artist in the United States." The two signature pieces for the show, Sunny Texas and Secret Garden, capture the life they have built for their family in the arid region of their adopted country.

Inspired by the light and landscape of two worlds, Aleksander's impressionistic work reveals his classical training while creating a warmth and energy reflective of the artist himself. Lyuba's talent lies in her visual narratives. The elements she gathers for a still life tell a story awash in vibrant colors, while her festive village scenes conjure the folklore of her childhood.

high-resolution images:
Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas

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Lyuba Titovets / Harmony
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

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Aleksander Titovets / Sunny Texas
oil on canvas / 16 x 20 in.

 

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